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Nitrogen, disease, key factors for 2010 corn

  • Nitrogen, disease, key factors for 2010 corn

    Now that harvest has wrapped up in many areas, you have some time to take a good hard look at what worked and what didn’t in 2010.
    Here are a few agronomic developments and challenges that Pioneer Hi-Bred officials discussed during a Carrollton, Missouri, field day last August.

  • Nitrogen, disease, key factors for 2010 corn - Hybrid N use

    Seed companies have been busily creating hybrids that use nitrogen (N) better. Some hybrids are more efficient N users than others, says Greg Luce, Pioneer agronomy research manager. “Sometimes, it’s apparent just when two hybrids are next to each other,” he adds.

  • Nitrogen, disease, key factors for 2010 corn - N use traits coming

    Pioneer is also working on traits to improve N use, says Luce. It’s using both native and transgenic approaches. These traits aim at boosting yields by 10% with existing N levels, or maintaining yields with 20% to 30% less N. Pioneer plants to introduce these traited hybrids in less than 10 years.

  • Nitrogen, disease, key factors for 2010 corn - N deficiencies surface

    Prolific growing-season moisture took the top off many 2010 corn yields. The culprit? One that’s reflected in the yellow-tinged leaves in the photo above—lack of nitrogen (N) during critical times.
    “Soils with excessive moisture will denitrify, even those with good organic matter,” says Luce.

  • Nitrogen, disease, key factors for 2010 corn - Late season N pays

    One bright spot in such situations is that high-clearance equipment is now available that can add N as corn nears tasseling and beyond. “Normally, you can get a response,” says Luce.
    That’s the case even as late as the silking phase. University of Missouri (MU) and University of Nebraska research have demonstrated that in years with nitrogen shortages, there is a strong yield response to N even through the R2 (blister) growth stage.

  • Nitrogen, disease, key factors for 2010 corn - Take care with nonionic surfactants

    Thinking about applying a fungicide? It can pay, especially when fungal disease is imminent. Just take care when using a non-ionic surfactant, says Scott Dickey, Pioneer Hi-Bred area agronomist in Missouri. Including one with a fungicide and spraying too early can result in deformed ears like this one.

  • Nitrogen, disease, key factors for 2010 corn - Watch timing

    Non-ionic surfactants can play a role in boosting fungicide performance. Just use them at brown silk or later to reduce the chances of malformed ears, says Dickey.

  • Nitrogen, disease, key factors for 2010 corn - Fungicides indirectly curb stalk rots

    One advantage that foliar fungicide treatments have is that although they don’t directly help with stalk rots, they indirectly do,” says Dickey. “By keeping leaf tissue healthy, they help plants keep from cannibalizing themselves.

  • Nitrogen, disease, key factors for 2010 corn - Don't be suckered

    Don’t be suckered into planting low corn plant populations. Take this advice literally. If you don’t, you’ll end up with suckers—those immature ears that steal water and nutrients but produce no grain.
    “High plant populations (for Missouri) in the low to mid 30,000s reduce suckering,” says Dickey. “If you plant in the low 20,000s, you can have suckering like crazy.”

Now that harvest has wrapped up in many areas, there's time to discern what worked in 2010. Here are some agronomic developments that Pioneer Hi-Bred officials discussed during a Carrollton, Missouri, field day.

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