Home / Crops / Corn / Corn Production / Moths heaviest in Nebraska, central Iowa, northwestern Illinois, entomologists confirm

Moths heaviest in Nebraska, central Iowa, northwestern Illinois, entomologists confirm

Agriculture.com Staff 07/28/2006 @ 9:10am

Trap monitoring this week confirmed that western bean cutworm (WBC), a destructive insect that can cause severe yield loss in corn fields, has spread further into the northern half of Illinois and northwestern areas of Indiana, as well as many counties in Wisconsin.

The heaviest moth flights are being reported across Nebraska, Iowa and northwestern Illinois. In Iowa alone, as of July 24, traps in about half of the state had captured between 100 and 500 moths while traps in 14 counties around the state found more than 500 moths, according to the Iowa State University Western Bean Cutworm Monitoring Network.

Reports of spraying unprotected fields are on the rise as increased populations surface. The timing of WBC infestations is similar to 2005, but possibly a week or so earlier due to recent warmer weather. With corn pollination nearly complete, increased feeding can be expected over the next few weeks.

Pioneer Hi-Bred International, Inc., has joined several universities in the effort to track eastward movement of WBC. Pioneer agronomists and sales representatives in Iowa, Illinois, Missouri, Minnesota and Wisconsin are monitoring more than 200 WBC pheromone traps.

Young WBC larvae initially feed on tassels and silks, before moving into corn ears and attacking developing kernels. Direct yield loss, as well as ear quality damage, occurs as larvae consume all or parts of developing kernels. Because of the labor intensive nature of scouting, the critical timing needed for insecticide applications and the possibility that multiple treatments may be necessary, insecticides may not be an economical or effective solution to the WBC problem.

Fields planted with in-plant control of WBC with the Herculex® I and Herculex® XTRA insect protection traits have shown to be effective in protecting corn against WBC.

Trap monitoring this week confirmed that western bean cutworm (WBC), a destructive insect that can cause severe yield loss in corn fields, has spread further into the northern half of Illinois and northwestern areas of Indiana, as well as many counties in Wisconsin.

CancelPost Comment
MORE FROM AGRICULTURE.COM STAFF more +

Farm and ranch risk management resources By: 07/07/2010 @ 9:10am Government resources USDA Risk Management Agency Download free insurance program and…

Major types of crop insurance policies By: 07/07/2010 @ 9:10am Crop insurance for major field crops comes in two types: yield-based coverage that pays an…

Marketing 101 - Are options the right tool… By: 07/07/2010 @ 9:10am "If you are looking for a low risk way to protect yourself against prices moving either higher or…

MEDIA CENTERmore +
This container should display a .swf file. If not, you may need to upgrade your Flash player.
Are We In a Climate Change?