Home / Crops / Corn / Corn Production / Planting corn after June 20 nets 50% yield loss, specialist says

Planting corn after June 20 nets 50% yield loss, specialist says

Agriculture.com Staff 06/10/2008 @ 1:19pm

A costly deadline looms for many growers in the Midwest, as every day of waiting for the weather to cooperate to plant corn and soybeans reduces potential yields.

Research indicates that Illinois growers who plant corn or soybeans near the end of June, for example, can expect a 50% reduction in crop yield, according to University of Illinois Extension agronomist Emerson Nafziger.

A cooler- and wetter-than-average spring has left Illinois and Indiana furthest behind on planted corn and soybeans, according to USDA data. Several other states are lagging behind their normal planting schedules, but by a lesser margin.

In Illinois, the corn was seven inches high as of June 9, compared to an average of 17 inches by this time in recent years.

Nafziger says cool temperatures and the third-wettest January-through-April time period since 1895 in Illinois have led to delays that are undercutting potential yields.

"This has been a bad spring by most measures," Nafziger says in a university report. "We keep seeing forecasts that look favorable and then that doesn't happen. The chance of having above-average yields has diminished greatly."

Inclement conditions have led to delays that are undercutting potential yields. Nafziger's analysis of previous years' corn planting data in Illinois determined that "we can expect 50% of the maximum yield when planting is done around June 15 to 20."

Those growing soybeans in southern Illinois may get 50% of their maximum yield if they plant no later than June 25 to 30, he adds.

Some growers -- in southern Illinois especially -- will have to replant as wet conditions have caused some seed to rot.

Most growers will not get the yields they expected, but high prices for their crops -- and crop insurance -- should see them through, Nafziger adds.

"Even with high costs, the yield needed to cover costs is relatively low when corn is more than $6 a bushel," he says. "But we're looking at some real disappointment at having so much income potential not realized this year due to weather-related crop problems."

A costly deadline looms for many growers in the Midwest, as every day of waiting for the weather to cooperate to plant corn and soybeans reduces potential yields.

CancelPost Comment
MORE FROM AGRICULTURE.COM STAFF more +

Farm and ranch risk management resources By: 07/07/2010 @ 9:10am Government resources USDA Risk Management Agency Download free insurance program and…

Major types of crop insurance policies By: 07/07/2010 @ 9:10am Crop insurance for major field crops comes in two types: yield-based coverage that pays an…

Marketing 101 - Are options the right tool… By: 07/07/2010 @ 9:10am "If you are looking for a low risk way to protect yourself against prices moving either higher or…

MEDIA CENTERmore +
This container should display a .swf file. If not, you may need to upgrade your Flash player.
Soybeans Rally on Demand, Weather