You are here

EPA approves new corn herbicide

Corn growers now have access to a new one-pass, full-season weed control tool, as the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) recently approved Corvus herbicide from Bayer CropScience, according to a company report.

Company officials say Corvus combines two active ingredients to control 50+ broadleaf weeds and grasses from burndown through early postemergence.

A half-inch of rain can reactivate Corvus, even after a dry period. This feature makes Corvus less sensitive to random and sporadic spring precipitation, enabling it to control weeds up to 2 inches in early-season corn.

"In our 2008 trials, we saw that Corvus was very competitive during the rainy season," says Brent Philbrook, Bayer CropScience new products development manager. "When we measured it against other products, Corvus kept fields clean through crop canopy closure."

Whether growers have a wet or hot-and-dry season, Corvus will take down weed competition when applied to corn through the V2 stage, says Jeff Springsteen, Bayer CropScience product manager for selective corn and soybean products.

"Corvus provides long-lasting residual control by translocating through the roots and shoots of weeds," he adds.

Corvus controls weeds and grasses like Palmer amaranth, waterhemp, woolly cupgrass and yellow foxtail. The one-pass herbicide is perfect for any tillage program, including no-till and minimum till, company officials say.

"We want growers to have more options in their field management toolbox," says Springsteen. "By helping growers fight problem weeds and resistance issues, we can ultimately help them increase their bottom line."

For the 2009 growing season, Corvus will be available with limited supply in Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kentucky, Missouri, Ohio, Pennsylvania and Tennessee.

Corn growers now have access to a new one-pass, full-season weed control tool, as the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) recently approved Corvus herbicide from Bayer CropScience, according to a company report.

Read more about

Crop Talk

Most Recent Poll

How much of your 2016 soybean crop is planted?