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Soybean planting wrapped up for two High Yield Team farmer panel members

Agriculture.com Staff 05/19/2006 @ 1:37pm

One of the best feelings farmers have each year is the relief they experience when they finish planting. "The clock is ticking, and you aren't in the race until the seeds are in the ground," says Chuck Myers, a member of the High Yield Team farmer panel from Lyons, Nebraska.

That's why Myers felt good earlier this week when he wrapped up soybean planting. Myers had a planting season that was relatively free of rain.

"We had one rain at the end of April when we were planting corn, and it hasn't rained since," he says. "We need a good rain."

That would give Myers' soybeans a pop when they emerge. So far, there have been some cold evenings that haven't been conducive to emergence, but the near-term forecast is for warmer weather.

"Ground temperatures were actually going backwards, but today is going to be nice," he says. "No beans are up yet, but the early planted beans will soon be up with warmer weather. Most corn has emerged."

Myers plants all glyphosate-tolerant soybeans. "We're still pretty much weed free, except for winter annuals and early spring weeds like marestail, prickly lettuce, and kochia," he says. Before beans emerge, he plans to spray a burndown of glyphosate and come back 3 to 4 weeks later with a final pass of glyphosate just before canopy.

"One of the new things I'm doing this year is planting Vistive low-linolenic soybeans," he says. "I'll deliver them to Cargill in Sioux City for processing into soybean oil."

Vistive low-linolenic soybeans, which Monsanto launched in 2005, are used in making soybean oil that is free of trans fats. Trans fats have been linked to coronary heart disease and strokes. This year, Monsanto officials say nearly 500,000 acres will be planted in regions of the Midwest including northern Iowa, southeastern South Dakota, northeastern Nebraska, southern Minnesota, Indiana, and southern Michigan.

An early-season pest that Myers will monitor is bean leaf beetle. None have yet surfaced because no soybeans have emerged, but Myers plans to scout for them when emergence occurs. "Early emerging fields are where they will hit first and hit hardest," he says.

Ron Heck, another High Yield Team farmer panel member from Perry, Iowa, finished planting his soybeans on May 10. "All in all, we're off to a good start. Beans were planted on time."

Cool temperatures have delayed emergence. Although temperatures have hovered at times below freezing, they did no damage to his soybeans because they had not emerged.

Strong winds surfaced the morning of May 10 and that kept up through the end of this week also have stymied spraying plans. "The last couple of days, there have only been a few moments where some could go and spray."

Bean leaf beetles are also on Heck's radar. "We haven't seen any yet, but it is on my to do list for scouting," he says.

One of the best feelings farmers have each year is the relief they experience when they finish planting. "The clock is ticking, and you aren't in the race until the seeds are in the ground," says Chuck Myers, a member of the High Yield Team farmer panel from Lyons, Nebraska.

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