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Suffering crops in Brazil

  • 01

    Even in the regions that were most affected by the dry spell in Parana, it is possible to find areas of good production. Poor distribution of rainfall is due to La Niña (photo by Antonio Costa, Gazeta do Povo).

  • 02

    Farmer Richard Dijkstra, from Ponta Grossa in central Parana, expects good yields -- as high as 60 bushels/acre -- in late-planted soybean fields (photo by Hugo Harada, Gazeta do Povo).

  • 03

    Prolonged drought had dried up and killed plants in the field and damaged the soybean in northwestern Parana (photo by Antonio Costa, Gazeta do Povo).

  • 04

    Farmer Claison Silva shows the impact of uneven rainfall distribution in the Northwest Parana; Fields sown at the same time with the same kind of seed have very different conditions (photo by Antonio Costa, Gazeta do Povo).

  • 05

    Green pods and lightweight grains: Lower yields and quality problems take profits away from farmers in western Parana (photo by Antonio Costa, Gazeta do Povo).

  • 06

    With a lack of rain, plants shed pods and grains didn’t filled properly in Toledo in western Parana, one of the regions that were most affected by drought in December and January (photo by Antonio Costa, Gazeta do Povo).

  • 07

    With 79.7 bushels/acre of corn lost to drought, farmer Claudio Antonio de Oliveira from Campo Mourao in west-central Parana says he will be happy with 119.5 bushels/acre average yield this year (photo by Antonio Costa, Gazeta do Povo).

  • 08

    With plenty of moisture, Manfred Becker’s corn is yielding 183.2 bushels/acre in Guarapuava in central Parana (photo by Hugo Harada, Gazeta do Povo).

  • 09

    Dry spell hit Ari, Flavio and Giovani Marcolin’s crop, but father and sons still expect above average yields this year 160 bushels/acre of corn and 60 bushels/acre of soybean (photo by Hugo Harada, Gazeta do Povo).

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    Farmer Marcelo Cambrussi, from Bom Jesus in western Santa Catarina, shows that the land remains dry even after recent rains (photo by Hugo Harada, Gazeta do Povo).

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    After shedding a lot of flowers and small pods, soybean yields were hurt but farmer Daniel Fabris still expects close to average results in western Santa Catarina (photo by Hugo Harada, Gazeta do Povo).

  • 12

    Corn fields in Abelardo Luz in western Santa Catarina, rose through the hot, dry weather unharmed (photo by Hugo Harada, Gazeta do Povo).

  • 13

    Early-planted corn being harvest in Abelardo Luz in western Santa Catarina is averaging 190 bushels/acre, a pretty good outcome for a year like this one (photo by Hugo Harada, Gazeta do Povo).

  • 14

    With very little or no rain throughout the season, early planted soybeans have not closed across the rows in Airton Becker’s farm (photo by Hugo Harada, Gazeta do Povo).

  • 15

    But, late planted fields have benefited from recent rains and can still yield fairly well in Cruz Alta in northern Rio Grande do Sul (photo by Hugo Harada, Gazeta do Povo).

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    After losing entire fields to drought, farmers try to minimize losses replanting the soybeans outside the optimum window in northern Rio Grande do Sul (photo by Hugo Harada, Gazeta do Povo).

  • 17

    Uneven ear weight and length and very few grains in the same plowing in Cruz Alta, northern Rio Grande do Sul, one of the regions that were most affected by drought in Brazil (photo by Hugo Harada, Gazeta do Povo).

  • 18

    In the region of Cruz Alta (northern Rio Grande do Sul), it is not difficult to find corn ears without a single grain (photo by Hugo Harada, Gazeta do Povo).

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    Corn being harvested in Cruz Alta (northern Rio Grande do Sul) is inappropriate even for silage (photo by Hugo Harada, Gazeta do Povo).

  • 20

    Drought hit corn pretty hard in Rio Grande do Sul, like this uneven corn emergence and poor stand in Cruz Alta (photo by Hugo Harada, Gazeta do Povo).

  • 21

    Irrigated fields are the only ones left standing in Rio Grande do Sul. In this case, corn is yielding even more than last year (photo by Hugo Harada, Gazeta do Povo).

  • 22

    Drought was so severe in the region of Cruz Alta (northern Rio Grande do Sul) that it dried ponds and made center pivot irrigation systems useless (photo by Hugo Harada, Gazeta do Povo).

Taking stock of La Nina drought damage in Brazil (photos & information courtesy Luana Gomes & Gazeta do Povo).

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