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Which tillage system is for you?

Travis Rowe says he's been getting a lot of questions from farmers in his area about tillage systems. The Certified Crop Adviser (CCA) and area sales manager for Champaign Landmark, Inc., in Mount Vernon, Ohio, says this will likely be a segment of crop technology that sees a lot of change with the 2009 crops in his area.

"It seems that more growers are asking questions about what tillage system is best, and I imagine that this will be a popular question in the next few years as well," says Rowe, who's also a CCA Correspondent on the Agriculture Online Crop Tech Tour. "I think that most growers are trying to find the right blend between no-till and full tillage systems."

So, what's the best approach? There's no single answer. Consider factors like labor in addition to input costs in making tillage plans for '09, Rowe advises.

"I personally don't really think there is one system that is the best, but that it comes down to the individual farmers fall and spring work load as well as individual preference," he says.

One development that's finding some traction in farmers in Rowe's area of northwestern Ohio is a combination of vertical tillage and no-till. This type of system has big benefits when planting time rolls around, he says.

"A number of growers in the area have purchased vertical tillage tools over the last year and I'm excited to see how those fields perform over the course of the growing season," Rowe says. "One thing I think can be said for sure is they do a great job of making a nice smooth seedbed for planting."

Travis Rowe says he's been getting a lot of questions from farmers in his area about tillage systems. The Certified Crop Adviser (CCA) and area sales manager for Champaign Landmark, Inc., in Mount Vernon, Ohio, says this will likely be a segment of crop technology that sees a lot of change with the 2009 crops in his area.

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