Home / Crops / Wheat / Wheat Production / Consider seed treatments for late-planted soybeans, says Syngenta

Consider seed treatments for late-planted soybeans, says Syngenta

Agriculture.com Staff 06/16/2008 @ 9:00am

Soybean seed treatments normally benefit early-planted soybeans the most. However, those of you faced with planting late-season soybeans or replanting soybeans may benefit this year, says Mark Jirak, crop manager, Syngenta seed care.

"We're seeing some real issues with stand establishment and root health with all the water," says Jirak. He and other Syngenta officials spoke at a mid-June Syngenta seed care field day near Gilbert, Iowa.

Generally, seed treatments benefit early-planted soybeans more than later-planted soybeans, due to pathogens that thrive in early cold and wet soils. The impact of seeding-time stressors normally decline later in the spring, when soils warm up and become more conducive for soybean planting and emergence.

However, sopping wet soils could lead to a seed treatment payoff this year, says Jirak.

"There is a reason replanting has to occur," he says. Unplanted wet soils slated for soybeans or flooded acres slated for replanting are a haven for pathogens that seed treatments can help thwart.

Insecticide seed treatments can also help nix later-season insects. "The later you plant, the more insects you encounter," says Jirak. "Lots of beans in the South get treated when double cropped, since they have more insects there."

Soggy soils also can exacerbate disease severity. For example, plant pathologists often categorize diseases like rhizoctonia and fusarium as "nibblers." They slowly damage soybeans without killing them right away. "But in a wet year, they can be killers," says Jirak.

Seed treatments help prevent pathogens from entering mechanically damaged or poor quality seed.

"Mechanical seed damage may be the single greatest cause of poor germination and low seedling vigor," says Mark Miller, Syngenta seed care application specialist. "You can have leakage of carbohydrates or amino acids, and it's an entry way for pathogens to attack the seed. Handle soybeans with TLC (tender loving care) all the time."

Miller also advises letting treated soybeans dry prior to planting. This will help avoid seed sticking during planting.

Syngenta announced a couple new fungicides that can be used on corn. Both currently have common rather than brand names.

TBZ, set for market in 2010, is a four-way mix of thiabendazole and active ingredients in Maxim XL, Apron XL, and Dynasty. "This will give enhanced fusarium and seedborne disease activity," says Jirak.

Syn 524, slated for 2011, will be registered for corn and other crops like cotton. This new chemistry has excellent activity on rhizoctonia and head smut.

Soybean seed treatments normally benefit early-planted soybeans the most. However, those of you faced with planting late-season soybeans or replanting soybeans may benefit this year, says Mark Jirak, crop manager, Syngenta seed care.

CancelPost Comment
MORE FROM AGRICULTURE.COM STAFF more +

Farm and ranch risk management resources By: 07/07/2010 @ 9:10am Government resources USDA Risk Management Agency Download free insurance program and…

Major types of crop insurance policies By: 07/07/2010 @ 9:10am Crop insurance for major field crops comes in two types: yield-based coverage that pays an…

Marketing 101 - Are options the right tool… By: 07/07/2010 @ 9:10am "If you are looking for a low risk way to protect yourself against prices moving either higher or…

MEDIA CENTERmore +
This container should display a .swf file. If not, you may need to upgrade your Flash player.
Waiting For the Planting Window