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Glyphosate applications important in no-till wheat

Agriculture.com Staff 08/31/2006 @ 7:57am

In the past few years, winter annual grass species like downy brome, cheat and annual bluegrass, as well as winter annual broadleaf species like common chickweed, marestail and cressleaf groundsel, have become more prevalent in no-till winter wheat.

Many of these weeds can be effectively managed with a preplant/preemergence application of glyphosate. This is often a more effective treatment for winter annuals, compared to the herbicides that can be applied broadcast to wheat in late fall or early spring. A dense population of winter annuals or dandelion may have already suppressed wheat growth by the time a fall or spring treatment can be applied. The preplant glyphosate application is also the most effective and least expensive tool to control dandelions and winter annual grasses.

A rate of at least 0.75 pounds of glyphosate acid per acre provides effective control in any field that contains dandelion. Include ammonium sulfate, as well as the appropriate amount of surfactant if specified by the product label in glyphosate treatments. The activity of herbicides on dandelions may be reduced where fall dandelion growth has been less than vigorous as a result of dry conditions.

Also, the preplant herbicide application timing for wheat is somewhat earlier than the optimum timing for fall dandelion control. However, the control attained by a glyphosate application makes it worth the effort, even if dandelions are not in the optimum condition.

No 2,4-D product label supports this use of 2,4-D. There is some risk of stand-reduction and injury to wheat from preplant applications of 2,4-D. One argument in favor of the use of 2,4-D would be to avoid overuse of glyphosate and slow the development of herbicide resistance. However, 2,4-D can be used with glyphosate in fall and spring herbicide treatments prior to corn and soybean planting, and would probably be best avoided prior to wheat planting.

In the past few years, winter annual grass species like downy brome, cheat and annual bluegrass, as well as winter annual broadleaf species like common chickweed, marestail and cressleaf groundsel, have become more prevalent in no-till winter wheat.

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