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Walk the Walk, Talk the Talk

CHERYL TEVIS 11/14/2011 @ 11:34am Cheryl has been an editor at Successful Farming since 1979.

Family can be a powerful foundation of a business. But more is needed if you plan to pass on the family operation beyond the second generation.


Five generations of Humms have farmed near Breckenridge, Michigan. Ted and Sandy semi-retired in 2004. That same year, sons Kent and Olan and their wives formed an LLC partnership combining equipment and their parents’ land.


Their parents’ equipment was placed into a 10-year purchase plan, and the LLC made the final payment this year. Now Ted and Sandy are in the process of completing a plan for a formal transition of the farm business.


“Keeping the farm sustainable to carry on a strong family tradition for future generations is our main objective and challenge, along with continued expansion,” Olan said earlier this year when I interviewed him. It seemed apparent that they were headed in the right direction.


But the Humms knew that they didn’t have all of the answers. In early August, the three couples plus 3-month-old Maezee piled into a van and drove 580 miles to the Generating Success Conference in West Des Moines, Iowa.


I was happy to see them and impressed by their commitment to maintain the momentum of their long-range plan. The Humms were joined by farm families from 12 other states in search of ways to strengthen their business skills, grow their leadership, and become more productive and profitable.


At the conclusion of the conference, Olan told me, “We decided we’re doing some things right, but we need more written down. And we need to communicate more with family members.”


The Humms are not alone in this realization.


A survey of Generating Success Conference participants revealed these top two challenges:

• Making a plan for transition of farm asset ownership from one generation to the next.

• Maintaining good communication among family members.


Looking at these challenges, it’s clear that women are likely to play a key role.


Women seem hardwired to communicate, and these challenges require discussion and good listening skills. In fact, conference keynote speaker Jolene Brown argued that there’s a direct link between communication and productivity and profitability. “What if we created a contract for communications

as part of our job description?” she asked. “What if we were held accountable for fulfilling the contract terms?”


The conventional wisdom is that boys and men don’t talk about their problems because they’re embarrassed or don’t want to appear weak. But new research may shed light on this gender difference.


A University of Missouri study suggests that boys or men “just don’t see talking about problems to be a particularly useful activity,” says Amanda Rose, associate professor and researcher.

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