Home / Farm Management / Finances, Accounting, and Taxes / Tax preparation / New laws affect year-end tax planning

New laws affect year-end tax planning

Agriculture.com Staff 12/15/2010 @ 11:12am

By Gary Maydew


The Small Business Jobs Act signed by President Obama in September has three important implications for farmers’ year-end tax planning.

1. Faster equipment write-offs.

Before passage of the bill, the maximum amount that could be expensed in 2010 (the Sec. 179 expense allowance) was $250,000. The Act raised the limit to $500,000 for both 2010 and 2011. The Act also reinstated (for 2010 only) the 50% bonus depreciation. So you can take the bonus depreciation on what you don’t expense. 

Example 1: Farmer Smith purchases $700,000 worth of machinery in 2010. He can elect to expense $500,000. The remaining $200,000 is eligible for the bonus depreciation, in this case $100,000. Depreciation in 2010 on the remaining $100,000 would be $10,710. Hence, the total write-off in 2010 for the new purchases would be $610,710. Of course, if he takes the expense election and bonus depreciation, his depreciation for 2011 on the machinery will be smaller, in this case only $19,130.

Most farmers will have pretty healthy taxable incomes in 2010. If you have had a bad year, however, you don’t need to use either the expense allowance or the bonus depreciation. You must elect to use the expense election and elect not to use bonus depreciation. 

Example 2: Assume the same facts as in Example 1, except that Smith decides not to use the expense allowance or the bonus depreciation. His write-off in 2010 would be $74,970 ($700,000×.1071). In 2011 his depreciation would be $133,910 ($700,000×.1913).

The expense election and bonus depreciation rules are different for acquisition of used assets. The expense election may be used on used assets; however, bonus depreciation is limited to new assets.

In order to take the expense election or depreciation, you must have placed into service the machinery or equipment by year-end. But “placed into service” doesn’t mean that you actually have to have used the machinery, just that the item be ready for use.

Example 3: Smith purchases and has delivered to him a new combine by late December of 2010. The combine is ready for use. Even though he doesn’t do any harvesting until 2011, the combine is considered placed into service in 2010.

CancelPost Comment
MORE FROM AGRICULTURE.COM STAFF more +

Sweet Potato Pie with Hazelnut Streusel By: 11/20/2014 @ 12:38pm Number of Servings: 8 Prep: 1 hr 30 min Bake: 50 min to 55 min at 375°1 pound…

Perfect Ending Apple-Praline Pie By: 11/20/2014 @ 12:36pm Number of Servings: 8 Prep: 45 min |Bake: 55 min at 375° Pastry for…

Paradise Pumpkin Pie By: 11/20/2014 @ 12:34pm Number of Servings: 8 Prep: 30 min |Bake: 1 hr at 350° 1 8-ounce package cream…

MEDIA CENTERmore +
This container should display a .swf file. If not, you may need to upgrade your Flash player.
Cool Tools Christmas Edition: Craftsman Two-in-One