Home / Livestock / Cattle / Beef / Producers test ID program

Producers test ID program

Agriculture.com Staff 02/14/2007 @ 1:36pm

While many livestock producers are waiting to see how a national animal identification system will impact them, producers in seven states are playing a role in creating one. The Northwest Pilot Project is testing a system capable of tracing animals from processing back to the herd of origin within 48 hours.

Ranchers, feedlot operators, and others in the beef industry in Hawaii, California, Oregon, Washington, Idaho, Nevada, and Utah are involved, says Julie Laird, project coordinator. The project is funded by the USDA and carried out by the state cattle associations and departments of agriculture. Final results are expected in 2007.

Laird says the goal of the project has been to learn what will and won't work in terms of program structure and information flow. It also looks at how ID technologies can be applied for tracing animals through multiple segments and across state and national borders.

About 130 producers representing 30,000 animals are enrolled. They are mostly beef cow-calf operations, although dairy, bison, and sheep operations are also eligible.

Participating producers are asked to choose the type of identification they believe would work best for their operation -- group ID, electronic ID, visual ID, or a combination. Producers agree to implement the chosen identification system and submit records of cattle movement to the project.

In return, they receive compensation of $40 for a group entry, such as when a ranch delivers a group of calves to a feedlot, or 75¢ per animal for individual ID.

The program is designed to accommodate a variety of operation types, styles, and business goals.

"The key has been flexibility to allow things to work in the course of markets and real-world scenarios," says Laird.

For example, individual ID may be impractical for ranchers who have infrequent direct contact with cattle. Group ID may be a more feasible alternative for the cow/calf phase of the production chain and still provide for reliable traceability.

"When an ID system fits into how an operation is already doing business, instead of making the business fit the ID system, the system works much smoother," says Laird.

Julie Laird, Northwest Pilot Project
541/947-3868
www.northwestpilot.org

While many livestock producers are waiting to see how a national animal identification system will impact them, producers in seven states are playing a role in creating one. The Northwest Pilot Project is testing a system capable of tracing animals from processing back to the herd of origin within 48 hours.

CancelPost Comment
MORE FROM AGRICULTURE.COM STAFF more +

Farm and ranch risk management resources By: 07/07/2010 @ 9:10am Government resources USDA Risk Management Agency Download free insurance program and…

Major types of crop insurance policies By: 07/07/2010 @ 9:10am Crop insurance for major field crops comes in two types: yield-based coverage that pays an…

Marketing 101 - Are options the right tool… By: 07/07/2010 @ 9:10am "If you are looking for a low risk way to protect yourself against prices moving either higher or…

MEDIA CENTERmore +
This container should display a .swf file. If not, you may need to upgrade your Flash player.
Soybeans Rally on Crop Disease Concerns