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Join the National Poultry Improvement Plan

Agriculture.com Staff 02/01/2013 @ 4:31pm

To maintain the quality of your birds, join the National Poultry Improvement Plan.

The National Poultry Improvement Plan (NPIP) began in 1930 to control the disease Pullorum that eliminated entire flocks. The organization encourages today's poultry producers to enroll in the program to prevent this disease and others, such as Salmonella enteritidis, Salmonella typhoid, Mycoplasma gallisepticum, Mycoplasma meleagridis, Mycoplasma synoviae, and avian influenza.  

NPIP National Director Steve Roney says the program is a collaboration between the poultry industry and state and federal governments. Testing extends to all species, including includes commercial poultry, backyard poultry, exhibition poultry, waterfowl, turkeys, and game birds.

"The initial testing, and the testing for all birds, is for Salmonella pullorum and Salmonella gallinarum. That's the basis of the program," Roney says. "You have the option of choosing whether you would like to be Mycoplasma clean, or/and whether or not you would like to participate in the Avian Influenza program." Each state conducts annual testing.

Program participation is entirely voluntary, but Roney says the participation benefits include certification that poultry and poultry products destined for interstate and international shipments are disease-free. "It's been very successful, because we just rarely have a Pullorum isolation in the U.S. anymore. Another program advantage is that producers can use the seal of the NPIP when selling birds, and other NPIP members can buy birds and bring them freely into their flocks," says Roney. "If you're not a NPIP participant and you want to sell some birds, they have to be quarantined and go through special procedures to be able to buy your birds and bring them into their NPIP flock."

Each state keeps records, and the USDA can inspect them any time. Roney says in the event of a disease outbreak, the organization can trace any flock, find the location, and uncover when it was tested.

Learn how to become a participant in the National Poultry Improvement Plan.



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