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Farmers win Recognition Awards

Agriculture.com Staff 07/07/2010 @ 9:07am

Larry and Shirley Ellis, Lytton, Iowa When their 1918 barn was hit by a severe windstorm, the Ellises question was, "Do we restore it or build new?" Their answer was to replace half of the barn's foundation, all of the front siding, and repair trouble spots on the sides and back. New windows, doors and tracks, a new roof, and a fresh coat of paint will keep this barn working for many years to come.

Selmer Norgard, Berthold, North Dakota Selmer Norgard's centennial farm was homesteaded by his father Ole C. Olson in 1900. His father later changed his name to Chris O. Norgard, taking the family name he had left behind in Norway. Selmer took under his care the name and the barn built in 1912 by his father. The barn still serves much of its original purpose in housing cattle. After repairing the walls, installing new shingles, and painting in traditional red with white trim, Norgard has added antique displays to the barn's duties.

Donald E. and Martha R. Kuenzi, Helena, Missouri After being born in the farmhouse of this century farm in 1927, it is understandable that Dr. Donald Kuenzi would have some deep affection for its centerpiece. While in Nepal on a medical mission trip in 1999, the semi-retired doctor said he decided the Kuenzi barn must be restored. The infrastructure of the over 100-year-old barn was in excellent condition. However, the periphery of the barn needed a heavy overhaul. After completion, the newly painted green barn has been used as a gathering place for family and local groups.

Charles and Beatta Robben, Grinnell, Kansas The Robbens' 1910s house and 1920s barn are still standing due to continued upkeep. The barn was built on a new foundation after the original had been lost to fire. Now the unusually shaped structure, which is as high as it is long, is used for calving, hay, and equipment storage. In the latest bit of upkeep, the gothic roof was covered with long sheets of custom-cut tin to avoid horizontal seams. To find the finished product, just look for the big white barn with the silver roof.

Joseph and Lisa Marhofer, Belding, Michigan Before 1915, the barn housed work horses and dairy cows under a gable roof. Now the barn has a north addition, a gambrel roof, and houses sheep, hay, and equipment. Because of his family's connections with the barn and its extensive history, Joe decided to install center-match lumber on two walls and apply a fresh coat of paint to add another chapter of history to this family icon.

Larry and Shirley Ellis, Lytton, Iowa When their 1918 barn was hit by a severe windstorm, the Ellises question was, "Do we restore it or build new?" Their answer was to replace half of the barn's foundation, all of the front siding, and repair trouble spots on the sides and back. New windows, doors and tracks, a new roof, and a fresh coat of paint will keep this barn working for many years to come.

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