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Farmers win Recognition Awards

Agriculture.com Staff 07/07/2010 @ 9:08am

Shelley Place, Homer, Illinois In describing the connecting barns, Shelley says, "The barns were always filled with cattle and hay when I was growing up." Once again the barns are filled with livestock. The roof was supported by jacks as rotten top plates were replaced. A lean-to and a poor garage addition were removed. Twenty-six gallons of red paint and 10 gallons of white paint were hand brushed into well-prepared, original boards. The structure is now a testament to the work of three generations.

Ralph and Tammy Ketvertis, Levering, Michigan Ralph's grandfather bought this picturesque farm in 1937. In 2000, Ralph and Tammy wanted to restore the barns, which had suffered over the years due to leaky roofs and heavy snow. With hammer and nail, fresh lumber and paint, the barns are now displaying, storing, and selling farm-fresh products, including pumpkins, gourds, squash, and ornamental corn.

George L. Mitchell, Jr., Turners, Missouri The barn and the farm began with turkeys in the early 1930s. George's grandfather raised 5,000 turkeys each year and dressed them in the barn. The advent of refrigeration after WWII diminished fresh turkey sales, and the barn was converted to dairy cows and finally to beef cattle. A second story was removed; the roof was extended for shelter and structural support. The barn is now used for machinery storage.

David and Gail Mooter, Ellen Wesemann, Kennard, Nebraska The Wesemann farm was purchased in 1950 by Gail's father, Henry Wesemann. Over the years, the farm has changed from a crop and animal operation to crop only. The barn is now used to house machinery for managing land in prairie grass, woodland, and garden plots. Its adaptation began in 1999 with a roof replacement. This included the restoration of its cupola, weather vane, and original lightning rods. The restoration and release of four of the six doors from immobility, pouring cement for the floor, and the finishing coat of paint are now honored on "Old Barn Lane."

James M. Mills, Lower Salem, Ohio Restoring barns is old hat to Jim Mills. The century-old barn was in dire need of foundation work and siding repair when he inherited it in 1996. As a veteran of barn rehabilitation and with the help of his contractor, Mills straightened the end walls and rebuilt the floor joists and sills. White pine he planted around 1953 was used for the flooring and siding. Six thousand board feet later, the barn stores hay and equipment.

Shelley Place, Homer, Illinois In describing the connecting barns, Shelley says, "The barns were always filled with cattle and hay when I was growing up." Once again the barns are filled with livestock. The roof was supported by jacks as rotten top plates were replaced. A lean-to and a poor garage addition were removed. Twenty-six gallons of red paint and 10 gallons of white paint were hand brushed into well-prepared, original boards. The structure is now a testament to the work of three generations.

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