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Bryce Streibel of Fessenden, North Dakota, says collapsing barns remind him of cattle falling to the ground at slaughter time - and he doesn't like the looks of either. "I didn't like slaughter time and I don't like to see those old barns come down," he says. Streibel's efforts to save his historic barn and update it for use on his farm won him a 1996 BARN AGAIN! Farm Heritage Award from Successful Farming Magazine and the National Trust for Historic Preservation. He shares the award with Wayne Schlafmann of Turtle Lake, North Dakota. Both are proud owners of historic barns that were brought back to useful life after years of neglect.

Bryce Streibel and his wife June returned to North Dakota from California in 1955 to take over his family's farm. "After paying the moving company, June and I had $1,200 left," Bryce recalls. "But we had crops to harvest, and we got by." After 20 years they retired from active farming. Bryce became involved in policy and politics, serving 16 years in the North Dakota House of Representatives and 16 years in the Senate. "I went from full-time farming to full-time meetings," he says.

Streibel credits his conservative philosophy with his success as a farmer. "When we were hauling grain, we'd make 10 trips in a one-ton truck that we'd paid for, while others were making one trip in a 10-ton truck that the bank owned," he says.

Bryce Streibel of Fessenden, North Dakota, says collapsing barns remind him of cattle falling to the ground at slaughter time - and he doesn't like the looks of either. "I didn't like slaughter time and I don't like to see those old barns come down," he says. Streibel's efforts to save his historic barn and update it for use on his farm won him a 1996 BARN AGAIN! Farm Heritage Award from Successful Farming Magazine and the National Trust for Historic Preservation. He shares the award with Wayne Schlafmann of Turtle Lake, North Dakota. Both are proud owners of historic barns that were brought back to useful life after years of neglect.

Bryce and June Streibel say
sentimentality was one reason
they decided to convert his
family's horse and cattle barn
into a grain storage facility.

It is this philosophy of making the best use of existing resources, as well as "a bit of sentimentality," that prompted Streibel to convert his family's sturdy old horse and cattle barn to a grain storage facility.

Seventy miles down the road from the Streibel place, Wayne Schlafmann ducks into his barn to escape a biting November wind. He points with pride to the special features of his barn, including an unusual two-story tower on one end, where hay wagons could be unloaded, fully protected from the weather. "The walls are double-sided and the barn stays warm in the winter and cool in the summer," he says. "It's a lot more comfortable to work in than a metal building."

Helen, Wayne and Susan
Schlafmann of Turtle Lake, ND,
won a BARN AGAIN! Award for
preserving their 1908 dairy
barn. The barn was rehabbed for
beef cattle.

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