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What nozzles should I pick to reduce drift?

Kacey Birchmier 02/05/2014 @ 6:48am I grew up on a fourth-generation farm in central Iowa. Follow me on twitter - @KaceyBirchmier.

Here’s a rundown of several nozzles that can reduce off-target movement while giving good pest control.

Turbo T Jet nozzle

This Spraying Systems nozzle was designed several years ago to replace drift tendencies of the extended range flat fan nozzle. It slices drift by 15-16% when compared to a similar sized extended range nozzle, says Wolf.

Its wide pattern and spray droplet quality make it an excellent choice to apply most insecticides, fungicides, and herbicides. However, Wolf says in areas where further drift reduction is needed, other designs will work better.

AIXR Air-Induction design nozzle

This nozzle is specifically designed to reduce drift while simultaneously providing adequate droplet size for coverage. Compared to early designed nozzles, it dramatically reduces off-target movement.

Greenleaf Turbo drop XL nozzle

This nozzle is one of the original air-induction venturi nozzles specifically designed to reduce off-target movement. It’s actually a two-part nozzle, consisting of a venturi and then a nozzle cap. This nozzle sucks air into the system as it sprays.

“This creates some pretty large droplets for the purpose of drift control,” says Wolf.

In tests, Wolf has run this nozzle at 60 pounds per square inch (psi), which is 20 to 30 psi higher than with demonstrations with older drift-control nozzles.

“At high pressures, this nozzle still has much less drift potential than some of the older technology,” says Wolf. “One of the challenges that we have when using a nozzle specifically designed for drift reduction is getting proper coverage to control the pests. It becomes a balancing act in selecting and using nozzles of this type to get the coverage needed to provide control and at the same time still have large enough droplets that you can minimize spray drift.”

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