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EMBRAPA: Brazil soy yield cut 5% by weather and late planting

Agriculture.com Staff 02/21/2006 @ 8:44am

Though parts of the crop has been damaged from being planted late followed by too wet or too dry growing conditions, Brazil's overall soybean yield reduction this year will not exceed 5% from the expected national production of 57 to 60 million metric tons, one EMBRAPA spokesman told Agriculture Online on Tuesday.

EMBRAPA, a Brazilian government agency equivalent to the USDA, bases its crop estimates from visual evaluations made by the Ministry of Agriculture.

Amélio Dall'Agnol, EMBRAPA's national coordinator of an upcoming crop consortium, said in an email that right now the Ministry of Agriculture reports indicate the Brazilian crop is "ok, exception made to the western parts of the states of Paraná, Santa Catarina and somewhat in Mato Grosso do Sul and southwest Paraná."

"In these areas, yield reduction could go up to twenty percent, but at the national level, reduction will not exceed five percent," Dall'Agnol said. "Yield reduction was high in early varieties planted very early in the season (Sept/Oct = March/April), precisely those varieties that in the previous two years had the best yield."

Dall'Agnol added, "Corn was more affected than soybeans in these areas.

To get a quantitative estimation of corn and soybean production, using a methodology adopted in the USA, Brazil is holding a nationwide crop rally on March 15.

Results of that rally will be available by the end of March.

When asked about the development of the Brazilian soybean crop, Dall'Agnol said it's in various stages.

"In the South (southern portion of the State of Paraná, Santa Catarina and Rio Grande do Sul) the soybean crop is at late flowering to the end of pod filling. From North/West Paraná to MidWest Brazil, crop is at pod feeling to maturity. Some farms had already harvested, particularly in mid/north Mato Grosso," Dall'Agnol said.

Asian soybean rust is causing more input costs for farmers, but little damage to crop, Dall'Agnol said. "The disease did not cause much yield reduction, but increased cost of production. Farmers are well informed on how to manage the disease, due to the actions of a Task Force (Consortium Anti Rust), aimed to bring available information to all 240,000 soybean farmers we believe exist in Brazil."

Though parts of the crop has been damaged from being planted late followed by too wet or too dry growing conditions, Brazil's overall soybean yield reduction this year will not exceed 5% from the expected national production of 57 to 60 million metric tons, one EMBRAPA spokesman told Agriculture Online on Tuesday.

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