Home / News / Crops news / USDA: Corn conditions unchanged, soybeans slightly better

USDA: Corn conditions unchanged, soybeans slightly better

Agriculture.com Staff 08/04/2008 @ 2:16pm

With the sharply bearish reaction on the CBOT trading floor Monday to whispers of continued favorable crop weather in the Midwest, it's clear crop weather is one of the -- if not THE -- major factors driving the marketplace.

But, even with favorable weather seen ahead -- like it's been in the last two weeks -- crop conditions aren't actually improving that much. That's according to Monday's USDA Crop Progress report. Conditions are good, but the clip at which they're improving is far from hare-like.

As of Sunday, 66% of the nation's corn crop was in good-to-excellent condition, unchanged from a week ago. Sixty-three percent of the country's soybean crop is in good-to-excellent shape, up one percent from last week. Even as the crops' quality is high, development remains just as it has been the last two to three weeks: Still in the ballpark of 10% behind the normal developmental pace.

While the near-term forecast is good for many areas' corn and soybean crops, there are pockets where farmers are experiencing tough conditions or starting to look ahead to what could be an early season-ender down the road: Early frost.

"In northern Minnesota, the newcomers and the ones with weak stomachs are starting to worry," writes Agriculture Online Crop Talk member mvp farms. "This might be one of those years we get burned up here."

"My corn went in around the first of May and beans were in by the 20th of May, so I'm not too worried. Normal frost around here is October 12," adds fellow Crop Talk member Jim Meade / Iowa City. "However, there are some late crops around here that might be pushing it if we have a frost by the end of September."

But, of more immediate concern to other growers is moisture. Even in this year where the moisture surplus has been the story, it's the lack of rain that's starting to stress corn in parts of the central and eastern Corn Belt.

"Here in west-central Ohio, the corn on the higher ground is going backward. We need rain now!" writes Crop Talk member 8570. Growers in north-central and northeastern Indiana report similar conditions.

With the sharply bearish reaction on the CBOT trading floor Monday to whispers of continued favorable crop weather in the Midwest, it's clear crop weather is one of the -- if not THE -- major factors driving the marketplace.

CancelPost Comment
MORE FROM AGRICULTURE.COM STAFF more +

Farm and ranch risk management resources By: 07/07/2010 @ 9:10am Government resources USDA Risk Management Agency Download free insurance program and…

Major types of crop insurance policies By: 07/07/2010 @ 9:10am Crop insurance for major field crops comes in two types: yield-based coverage that pays an…

Marketing 101 - Are options the right tool… By: 07/07/2010 @ 9:10am "If you are looking for a low risk way to protect yourself against prices moving either higher or…

MEDIA CENTERmore +
This container should display a .swf file. If not, you may need to upgrade your Flash player.
Looking Out for Soybean Cyst Nematodes