Home / News / Crops news / USDA: Corn, soybean plantings catch up to average pace

USDA: Corn, soybean plantings catch up to average pace

Agriculture.com Staff 05/14/2007 @ 2:35pm

Remember about two weeks ago, when what felt like endless rains kept lobbing delay after delay at corn farmers trying to get this year's crop in the ground? Questions abounded as to when -- if at all -- this year's corn crop would get planted.

Monday's USDA Crop Progress report goes a long ways to suppress those planting apprehensions. If Monday's numbers are any indication, U.S. farmers know how to play catch-up, and play it well.

According to Monday's report, 78% of the U.S. corn crop was planted as of Sunday, a 25% increase from a week ago and identical to the previous five-year average. The most notable progress was made in Nebraska, Wisconsin and Indiana, where farmers planted 33%, 38% and 36% of this year's corn crop, respectively, in the last week alone.

Conversely, other states' growers still lagged behind the average pace: Iowa planting progress was pegged at 77% Sunday, 10% lower than the previous five-year average. Kansas and South Dakota joined Iowa this week as the only other states behind-schedule in corn planting.

Soybean plantings also rode the warmer, drier air of the past seven days to slightly exceed the average pace. With the exceptions of Michigan, Kansas, Nebraska, Iowa and South Dakota, the 18 predominant soybean-growing states were all at or ahead of the average planting pace. Overall, 32% of the nation's soybeans have been planted, compared to both last year's and the previous five-year average pace of 31% for this week.

Corn emergence as of Sunday was slightly ahead of pace, while soybean emergence was slightly lagging. The country's winter wheat, sorghum, cotton and peanut crops' progress are all slightly behind in their progress, while spring wheat, barley and oat development are all ahead slightly.

Remember about two weeks ago, when what felt like endless rains kept lobbing delay after delay at corn farmers trying to get this year's crop in the ground? Questions abounded as to when -- if at all -- this year's corn crop would get planted.

CancelPost Comment
MORE FROM AGRICULTURE.COM STAFF more +

Farm and ranch risk management resources By: 07/07/2010 @ 9:10am Government resources USDA Risk Management Agency Download free insurance program and…

Major types of crop insurance policies By: 07/07/2010 @ 9:10am Crop insurance for major field crops comes in two types: yield-based coverage that pays an…

Marketing 101 - Are options the right tool… By: 07/07/2010 @ 9:10am "If you are looking for a low risk way to protect yourself against prices moving either higher or…

MEDIA CENTERmore +
This container should display a .swf file. If not, you may need to upgrade your Flash player.
Big Picture: CME Trading Weather