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Cullers breaks soybean yield record...again

Jeff Caldwell 10/13/2010 @ 10:17am Multimedia Editor for Agriculture.com and Successful Farming magazine.

Putting together the latest seed genetics, pest protection and seed treatments, farmer Kip Cullers has again set the world record for soybean yields on his farm near Purdy, Missouri.

This year, Cullers netted a yield of 160.6 bushels/acre, up 6 bushels/acre from his previous yield record set 3 years ago, according to the Missouri Soybean Association (MSA).

Cullers uses technology, like Pioneer's Y-Series soybeans, Stoller USA's Bio-Forge and BASF fungicide and herbicides, for a common goal: Managing crop stress.

"Weather conditions also are a significant factor, and we experienced times when conditions were not all that favorable this season," Cullers says in an MSA report. "However, with irrigation and managing for stresses along the way, yields came through."

The record-setting field, which Cullers managed intensively with the latest input technology, was planted to Pioneer's Y-Series variety 94Y71. In addition, he utilized Stoller USA's Bio-Forge product, which Stoller company officials say helped Cullers' field achieve earlier germination, "enhanced root systems," earlier nodulation and branching and "quick recovery from herbicide burndown stress."

"Kixor and Status helped my soybeans get off to an incredible start this year," adds Cullers in a BASF report. "And Headline is the key to keeping that momentum through the season. It produces happy, healthy plants. And happy, healthy plants produce more yield."



Though Cullers' yields well above the triple-digit mark for soybean yields is impressive, yields like these will one day become common as genetics -- like in Pioneer's Y-Series varieties -- and crop protection technology continues to develop, says Pioneer Hi-Bred president Paul Schickler.

"Breaking the 100-bushel-per-acre mark has become a more common occurrence as new technologies allow researchers to develop products with a complete package of offensive and defensive characteristics," Schickler says.

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