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U.S. Corn, Beans Holding Up In Dry Conditions

  • Corn Near Northfield, Minnesota

    “Corn started to tassel this week. We are in need of rain, but the 10-day forecast is predicting hot and dry conditions,” says Carol Peterson (Instagram: @carpet701). “Our last measurable rainfall was over a week ago.”

    In Minnesota, 79% of the state’s corn is rated good to excellent. Minnesota has one of the lowest percentages of corn rated poor to very poor at only 5% and 16% is rated fair, the USDA says.

  • Soybeans Near Wilmot, South Dakota

    “Corn and soybeans are holding on, but will need moisture soon,” says Jason Frerichs (Twitter: @jasonfrerichs). “Last week, some of our crops received spotty storms.”

    In South Dakota, 49% of soybeans are blooming while 5% are already setting pods, according to the latest Crop Progress report. 

  • Soybeans in Monroe City, Missouri

    “Some of the corn has already pollinated. A rain sure would be nice,” says Tyler Mudd (Instagram: @tmuddly17).

    Missouri soybeans are moving right along as 44% are blooming and 14% are setting pods. According to the latest USDA report, 65% of the state’s soybeans are rated good to excellent, 28% are rated fair, and 7% are rated poor or very poor.

  • Corn in Maxwell, Iowa

    “Shorter season hybrids are in the blister to early-milk stage,” says Rhonda Birchmier of Maxwell, Iowa. “Dry conditions are keeping the diseases at bay.”

    In Iowa, 37% of the state’s corn is silking. According to the USDA’s latest Crop Progress report, 71% of Iowa corn is rated good to excellent, 23% is rated fair, and 6% is rated poor or very poor.

  • Soybeans in Shadehill, South Dakota

    “Soybeans look good for what they’ve been through. The crops are still holding up in the dry and hot conditions,” says Doug Ham of Shadehill, South Dakota.

    South Dakota soybean quality is struggling as 33% of the state’s beans are rated poor to very poor, 38% are rated fair, and 29% are rated good to excellent, according to the latest Crop Progress report.

  • Corn in Daviess County, Indiana

    “I’m fighting the remaining beetles this week,” Ethan Clarke (Instagram: @the_ethan_clarke) says. “When applying fungicide, I threw in a cheap insecticide for around $4.50 an acre that seems to be working well on them.”

    According to the latest Crop Progress report, 39% of Indiana corn is silking. Quality-wise, 47% is rated good to excellent, 35% is rated fair, and 18% is rated poor or very poor.

  • Corn in Irving, Illinois

    “Rain late last night really was a relief for all the crops in the area,” says Luke Tuetken (Instagram: @tuek32). “Blistering heat is forecast this week so be safe out there.”

    Most (62%) of Illinois corn is looking good to excellent, but 29% is rated fair and 9% is rated poor to very poor, the USDA says. As for maturity, 63% of the state’s corn crop is silking.

  • Corn in Shadehill, South Dakota

    “The corn is hanging in there after 100+ temperatures and 20 mph winds. We were lucky to get some rain on the 4th of July, but very limited moisture,” says Doug Ham of Shadehill, South Dakota. “It's getting very critical, so we are hoping for some rain.”

    The lack of rain isn’t helping out South Dakota corn, which shows in this week’s quality ratings from the USDA: 30% good to excellent, 32% fair, and 38% poor to very poor. Only 11% of the state’s corn is silking.

  • Soybeans Near Northfield, Minnesota

    “Soybeans are just starting to flower. We’ll be scouting for aphids this week but overall, plants are looking good,” says Carol Peterson (Instagram: @carpet701).

    The USDA says 54% of Minnesota’s soybean crop is blooming and 11% is setting pods as of Sunday. As for crop quality so far, the latest Crop Progress report says 72% of Minnesota soybeans are in good to excellent condition, 22% are rated fair, and 6% are rated poor to very poor. 

  • Corn Near Wilmot, South Dakota

    “Hot and windy weather is taking a toll on the crop conditions. Surprisingly, there is heavy dew and humidity that keep the plants looking better,” says Jason Frerichs (Twitter: @jasonfrerichs). “The sandy and light areas of fields are burning up.”

Check out our weekly crop development slideshow featuring pictures from fields across the Midwest.

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