Home / Successful Farming / Successful Farming editors / Across the Editor's Desk: Serving healthy, happy consumers

Across the Editor's Desk: Serving healthy, happy consumers

Agriculture.com Staff 03/22/2006 @ 1:25pm

More consumers are learning something that regular attenders of the Fellowship of Christian Farmers (FCF) annual summer meeting have long known: Blueberries are mighty good, and they're mighty good for you, too.

Each evening during the annual meeting, FCF members enjoy fresh blueberries and ice cream. Ron and Phyllis Bodtke bring the blueberries from their farm near Grand Junction, Michigan. Ron is a longtime leader in the organization.

I thought of Ron and smiled as I read The Sonoma Diet book, newly released by Meredith Corporation, which also publishes Successful Farming magazine. The Sonoma Diet(tm) emphasizes what it calls the Top Ten Power Foods. Blueberries are among the stars in that group.

"Some nutrient-rich foods pack more nutrients than others, while some have other special qualities that give them an honored place on your plate," says the book's author, Connie Guttersen, a registered dietitian. "We call them power foods."

Joining blueberries in the Top Ten Power Foods of The Sonoma Diet are almonds, bell peppers, broccoli, grapes, olive oil, spinach, strawberries, tomatoes, and whole grains. Meat lovers like me have nothing to fear. There's ample room for beef, pork, lamb, and poultry in The Sonoma Diet. (To learn more and to order the book, see pages 50-52.)

Guttersen says blueberries are among the elite of heart-healthy foods. Blueberries also reduce your risk for certain types of cancer, vision loss, and digestive disorders.

Bodtke credits research support and promotion by the U.S. Highbush Blueberry Council and the North American Blueberry Council with spurring consumer and export demand of recent years. USDA played a key role, too.

"Research identified the positive attributes of blueberries," Bodtke says, "and our promotion efforts are getting the message to consumers."

North America dominates world blueberry production. Other countries are now eyeing the market, too.

"We must keep promoting and growing demand ahead of supply," Bodtke says. "My grandkids, who are interested in blueberry farming, are banking on our success."

The Bodtkes' farming operation, which also grows corn and soybeans, includes sons Tom and Larry and daughter Kay and their families. In recent years they have added blueberry farms in Washington and Oregon to their business.

Loren Kruse can be reached at loren.kruse (at) meredith.com.

More consumers are learning something that regular attenders of the Fellowship of Christian Farmers (FCF) annual summer meeting have long known: Blueberries are mighty good, and they're mighty good for you, too.

CancelPost Comment
MORE FROM AGRICULTURE.COM STAFF more +

Farm and ranch risk management resources By: 07/07/2010 @ 9:10am Government resources USDA Risk Management Agency Download free insurance program and…

Major types of crop insurance policies By: 07/07/2010 @ 9:10am Crop insurance for major field crops comes in two types: yield-based coverage that pays an…

Marketing 101 - Are options the right tool… By: 07/07/2010 @ 9:10am "If you are looking for a low risk way to protect yourself against prices moving either higher or…

MEDIA CENTERmore +
This container should display a .swf file. If not, you may need to upgrade your Flash player.
Cool Tools Christmas Edition: Part 2