Article

Cat Challenger 65

As early as 1981 Caterpillar was looking to created a rubber-tracked crawler to add to its extensive line of steel-track tractors. The aim was to create a machine that could run down the highway and not tear up the road.

The concept of utilizing rubber tracks in lieu of steel was by no means new. Cleveland Tractor Company had experimented and then sold a crawler, the Model HGR,  equipped with rubber tracks between 1945 to 1948. That concept had its drawbacks including a propensity for the rubber track to crawl off track assembly.

Article

Best 60

Much has been made of Benjamin Holt’s contributions to the development of the crawler tractor. And for good reason since Holt pioneered the many advances that made his Caterpillars some of the most popular crawlers of their time.

Article

Case IH Magnum Series

In 1987 the newly formed Case IH company, created from the merger of Case and International Harvester in the fall of 1985, announced that they were working on an entirely new, “from the ground up” design in a tractor series. The dealerships of the new company had been selling a compilation of Case- and IHC-designed tractors after the merger and were clamouring for new horsepower

Case IH engineers didn’t let them down. The fall of 1987 dealers were gathered in Denver, Colorado, to witness the new line, dubbed the Magnum series of tractors.

Article

IHC Farmall M-TA

Historically, the Farmall Model H was the overlooked little brother. As part of IHC’s new generation of Farmall tractors in 1939, the H lived in the shadow of its big brother, the Model M.

The M was the beefy big boy of the Farmall line. It stood out in the field of horsepower at the time because it was powerful and very attractive with streamlined styling. So strong was the M’s presence that several antique tractor historians have identified the M as one of the best-known tractors of all time.

Article

Ferguson Type A

Rarely does an engineering advance come along that has such an impact that it changes agriculture, let alone sets a standard for future tractor design.

Such was the case with Harry Ferguson’s Type A tractor.

Not that the Type A was an exceptional leap forward in tractor technology by itself, although it certainly was a solid machine. Rather, it was the device at work on the back of the tractor, a hydraulically powered three-point hitch, that made history.

Article

Ford-Ferguson 9N

For over 10 years, the marvel of the industrial revolution, Ford’s Rouge Plant outside of Detroit, had not built a single tractor. It kept turning out cars by the millions, but this plant had been home to the most successful tractor of all time – the Fordson.

Nearly 740,000 Fordsons exited the Rouge Plant’s doors until 1928 when its production stopped in the U.S., giving other manufacturers welcome relief. For the previous decade the tractor world consisted of Fordson and some other brands.

Article

Allis-Chalmers WC

Certainly Allis-Chalmer’s purchase of Advance-Rumely in 1931 put that company on the map as a major manufacturer of farm equipment.

But Allis lacked a modern tractor to match the times. IHC had introduced their revolutionary Farmall in 1924 establishing the row-crop tractor as the future of horsepower.

The fixed front axle fleet Allis was sending to their dealers was losing ground to the Farmall. Management in Milwaukee – home base for Allis-Chalmers – was demanding a machine to put them back into the market.

Article

All about the Top Shops Contest

A brand-new New Holland Model 218 skid-steer loader with a $35,435 retail value is up for grabs to the best shop innovations in the country!

Pages