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Corn Drydown and Drying Soybeans

Sadly another week of wet weather has gone by, further frustrating soybean harvest and wheat planting.          
Wheat Planting
​In one of my previous blogs, I discuss How late to plant wheat? The crop insurance deadline for sowing wheat at a reduced coverage level is October 25 in many areas.


Corn Drydown
In late October and early November, corn dries down about ¼ percent per day depending on weather. This diminishes as we get cooler and damp weather. Central and northern Ohio have a lot of late planted corn that is still running 25 percent moisture or more. Frustrating as it is, the corn is drying very slowly now and will reach a point where it won’t dry much more in the field. The weather outlook shows a brief warmup in the next week which will help some. It is time to move forward with corn harvest in these areas as stalk integrity is weak in some fields and on some hybrids. This is a reminder to do some  push/pinch tests so you know which fields to prioritize.
Drying Soybeans
​Though it is often expected that soybeans will come off the field at or below the desired moisture, sometimes harvesting wet beans is necessary to expedite harvest or for late planted soybeans. Here are some suggestions on drying soybeans.

High Temp Drying: Lower temps to 130-140 degrees F or less when putting them in a drier. Keep in the heat section for less than 30 minutes.

In Bin: For most farmers, it is more practical to put the beans in the bin and put air on them. Run the fan continuously until the drying front reaches the top of the bin. As we get late, and the air gets colder, run the fan until the beans are cold for winter storage, then resume air on them in the spring to finish drying them if necessary.



USDA Report


 

--- Ohio is 23 percent done with corn compared to 32 percent average



---Ohio is 36 percent done with soybean harvest compared to 56 percent average.


For more Agronomic News from Alex Johnson, Certified Crop Advisor, please visit his Agronomy Page on BecksHybrids.com.

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