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Rain Events Push Up Corn Rating

  • Corn Near Northfield, Minnesota

    “We received another timely rain this week of about an inch,” says Carol Peterson (Instagram: @carpet701). “The corn looks good, with kernels filling in to the end of the cobs.”

    Minnesota corn still looks pretty great, according to the USDA that says 81% of the state’s crop is in good or excellent condition. As for maturity, 54% of the state’s corn has reached the dough stage and 2% is dented. 

  • Corn in Irving, Illinois

    “Crops have had some cooler temperatures the last week or so, but could use a nice shower,” says Luke Tuetken (Instagram: @tuek32). “Beans are looking good.”

    Most of Illinois corn looks good to excellent, 62%, but 11% is rated poor or very poor, according to the latest Crop Progress report. As for maturity, 77% has reached the dough stage and 26% is dented (4% behind the state’s 5-year average rate).

  • Corn in Maxwell, Iowa

    In Iowa, 62% of the state’s corn crop has reached the dough stage, while 8% is dented as of Sunday. As for quality, 61% of Iowa’s corn is rated good or excellent, 27% is rated fair, and 12% is rated poor or very poor by the latest Crop Progress report. 

  • Corn in Shadehill, South Dakota

    “Been waiting for rain and it came with a price. Hailed pretty good, but only pea size with a lot of wind,” says farmer Doug Ham. “I knew it was only a matter of time this year with the way the weather has been; I’m glad there’s something left after a storm like that.”

    In South Dakota, 45% of the state’s corn has reached dough stage and 4% is dented. According to the latest Crop Progress report, 34% of the state’s corn is rated good to excellent, 35% is rated fair, and a hefty 34% is in poor or very poor condition. 

  • Corn in Daviess County, Indiana

    “We could use a few inches of rain; it’s shaping up to be a very mediocre year with poor markets,” says farmer Ethan Clarke (Instagram: @the_ethan_clarke).

    In Indiana, 65% of the state’s corn crop has reached dough stage and 20% is dented. As for quality, 55% of Indiana corn is in good or excellent condition, 29% is rated fair, and 16% is rated poor or very poor. 

  • Soybeans in Monroe City, Missouri

    “This 30-inch bean plot looks good, but we need a rain,” says Tyler Mudd (Instagram: @tmuddly17).

    According to the latest Crop Progress report, 88% of Missouri soybeans are blooming and 64% are setting pods at this point. Most, 64%, of Missouri beans are rated good to excellent, while only 9% are said to be in poor or very poor condition. 

  • Soybeans Near Wilmot, South Dakota

    “Nice rains have fallen in our area again recently. Nearly 2 inches covered all of our crops….South of us areas had 7 inches of rain,” says Jason Frerichs (Twitter: @jasonfrerichs). “100 miles of west of us the effects of drought are real where very little spring wheat was combined and much of the corn will be used for feed.”

  • Soybeans Near Northfield, Minnesota

    “Our soybeans continue to grow taller and thicker. Pods have started to form and appear to be plentiful and good sized,” says Carol Peterson (Instagram: @carpet701).

    A whopping 84% of Minnesota soybeans are setting pods, according to the USDA’s latest Crop Progress report. Quality-wise, the beans are looking quite good: 74% rated good or excellent, 20% rated fair, and 6% poor or very poor quality. 

  • Soybeans in Shadehill, South Dakota

    Farmer Doug Ham had his beans looking pretty good after a rain event last week, but then hail tore through the field. “Guess moisture comes with a price, but that was expected. We got good rain on the rest of my crops, so there’s always a plus to everything that happens!”

    South Dakota soybeans have looked better, according to the USDA that says 22% of the state’s beans are in poor or very poor condition. Luckily, 34% are still rated good to excellent. Maturity-wise, 82% of the state’s beans are setting pods.

Check out our weekly crop development slideshow featuring pictures from fields across the Midwest. 

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