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Six-year Data Shows Split Applied Urea is the Most Profitable Form of Nitrogen

Evaluation of the timing of nitrogen applications and the use of nitrogen inhibitors to protect a farmer’s nitrogen investment in wheat.
 
Due to the likelihood of soils being waterlogged in the late spring, many farmers prefer to make a one-pass nitrogen application while fields are frozen, generally at the Feekes 3 growth stage. A nitrogen inhibitor is often recommended to minimize the risk of nitrogen loss as saturated soils begin to warm in the early spring. 
 
This study takes a look at the timing of nitrogen applications and the use of nitrogen inhibitors to protect a farmer’s nitrogen investment in wheat. Each entry had a total of 120 lbs. of nitrogen applied, either as a single application or a split application. Nitrogen forms evaluated in this study include 30% UAN solution (both with and without Agrotain® Plus), urea, SuperU™ (urea with Agrotain Plus) and ESN®. Agrotain Plus contains both a urease inhibitor to minimize volatilization and a nitrification inhibitor. ESN is a polymer coated urea that results in a slow release of liquified urea as soil temperatures warm in the spring. Split applications occurred at Feekes 3 and 5. 
 
With six years of data from testing nitrogen forms and timing, we are confident to conclude that split applications of nitrogen are more profitable over time than single applications. Our data also concludes that there is no advantage to applying UAN + Agrotain Plus or ESN when compared to urea split applications. 
 
Click here for additional wheat study details on page 8 or download Beck’s entire 2015 PFR Book here
 
Beck's Hybrids PFR program conducts more than 75 different studies across multiple locations (500+ acres) to learn how different management practices and new technologies perform in field environments. Simply put, it is research focused with the farmer in mind.
 
Practical Farm Research (PFR)® is a registered trademark of Beck's Superior Hybrids, Inc. Agrotain® and SuperU™  are trademarks of  Koch Agronomic Services, LLC. ESN® is a registered trademark of Agrium, Inc.
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