Content ID

334131

Successful Farming covers: Mid-century harvest

While technology and techniques have certainly changed since the mid-1900s, farmers still plan and pray for a successful and safe harvest. That will never change.

November 1947

Today's farmers put a lot of thought into conservation, but so did many forward-thinking farmers of the past. On this cover from November 1947, farmer Albert Ebers of Nebraska says, "Conservation farming for me." That year, the average yield was 28.6 bushels per acre and the price per bushel was $2.16.

November 1947

October 1949

The Monson family is featured on this cover, and they are ready for harvest. Their home, landscaping, and equipment all look to be in tip-top shape.

October 1949

October 1951

A father and son, members of the Hellie family, smile at each other as they see the fruits of their labor being loaded into a cart. In the background, another family member rakes leaves.

October 1951

July 1953

This pretty cover features the Theron Peck farm in Sauk County, Wisconsin. Teamwork is key for this harvesting operation, as grain is loaded before being hauled to storage by the family's trusty Farmall.

July 1953 SF

October 1953

A corn grower's report on field shelling is the top story in this issue, which features Dwight Miller of Dallas County, Missouri, on the cover. The first corn head for a combine would be introduced the following year.

October 1953

October 1954

Jacob Schmitz examines his corn while his son stands by on the combine. The Sauk County, Minnesota, farmer is likely thinking about how much time and labor this brand new corn head technology will save his operation.

October 1954

July 1959

Arthur Knipp of Moniteau County, Missouri, is framed by his machinery as he watches grain fill his cart. Three of his children are watching from a safe distance, two perched on the fence and one peeking through.

July 1959

October 1959

This issue followed the Kindschi brothers of Sauk County, Wisconsin, all season, from wheel-track planting, to corn growing in a weed-free seedbed, to harvest. The clover blurb says their efforts "paid off in big yields, less work, and lower costs."

October 1959

July 1960

Everett Steele has a beautiful view of the sunset as he and his crew tackle the harvest on his Ford County, Kansas, farm. He has stopped for a moment to talk with someone in a very sharp white pickup truck.

July 1960

July 1964

Here, Paul Cocking of Whitman County, Washington, is at work harvesting Gaines wheat. This variety, introduced in 1962, is a semi-dwarf winter wheat that has better winter hardiness, making it ideal for the Pacific Northwest.

July 1964

November 1964

The corn is coming off the field on this farm, thanks to the four-row corn head. The top story in this issue discusses materials handling from field to market. It also included articles on cold weather livestock care, investing off the farm, and cake recipes.

November 1964

November 1965

In this interesting perspective, a farmer checks his corn in the bin. In 1965, the average yield was 74.1 bushels per acre, up 12 bushels from the year before, according to USDA. The average yield in 2021 was just over 100 more bushels per acre, at 175.4. In 1964, the average price per bushel was $1.16. In 2021, it was $5.74.

November 1965

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Will you have enough on-farm storage for harvest?

I just want to see the responses
49% (19 votes)
Yes
36% (14 votes)
Maybe, depending on yields
8% (3 votes)
No, it’s going to be a bin-buster
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No, I am looking at new bins or temporary storage
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