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Dinner In the Field

Planting season is under way, and it’s been a wet one in our corner of eastern North Carolina. This means when it’s dry enough to get in the field, my farmer is pulling long days and late nights.  

Some evenings, he waits and eats after the tractor is parked, but that could be 9 or 10 p.m. Other nights, the boys and I load up the car and deliver dinner to the field so he can eat at a decent time.  

This also gives us time to spend as a family, which is a precious commodity this time of year. Late nights often have him coming home after the boys are asleep, so taking dinner to the field gives them time to spend with their dad.  

When we arrived the other night, our sons jumped out of the truck to watch the tractor and vertical tillage tool moving across the field. As it got closer, our middle son started jumping up and down like he’d just won The Price is Right.

While my husband ate dinner, the boys peppered him with questions about what he was doing in the field. They shared stories about their day. All three boys ran up and down the field and around the tractor through the freshly tilled soil, which was a great way to wear them out before bed.

Depending on where my husband is working and where we are, sometimes dinner at the field comes from a drive-thru. For dinners cooked from home, I’ve got to step up my dinner-delivery game. I use a thermal bag, which keeps his plate semi warm. The styrofoam plate I use does the job, but everything ends up running together, and the tin foil barely stays in place. Luckily, my husband isn’t the picky eater I am and doesn’t mind it. Or maybe he’s just that hungry after putting in over 12 hours with more to come.

During the hustle of planting season and during harvest, we take family time when we can find it. Some days, that’s riding in the tractor together. Some nights, its sharing dinner on the hood of the truck with our boys running around. 

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