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In the In-Between

February may be the month of love, but I’m not in love with it. Don’t get me wrong; I love our home, my family, the livestock we raise, and the way of life we live. But I do not love this almost-end-of-winter-still-too-far-from-spring time of year. Sometimes in the midst of change, some things become constant and our constant of late has been rain.

For mornings on end, I’ve donned hat, bibs, coat, and boots to take on my gate-holding duties knee deep in mud while my husband feeds cows. It’s a necessary job that’s not necessarily fun, so I’ve been passing my gate-perched time day-dreaming. It’s a beautiful heart-eye dream of winning the lottery and spending it all on concrete. Because that’s what you dream of when you’re me, on this farm, in February mud. As it is, I don’t play the lottery, so this will most likely remain just that – a dream. For now anyway.

In the meantime, we’ll keep making the best with what we have, moving cows around as we can, and eventually the mud will dry up. It always does. The rain always eventually stops, and the sun always eventually shines. Then as it always happens, we’ll be wishing for rain again when the skies dry up, as they always eventually do. It’s the way of farming and it’s the way of life.

In-between can be hard and messy, but always worth plowing through.

It’s in the in-between that we learn to cope with the here and now. It’s in the in-between that we learn to appreciate the better days more. It’s in the in-between that we stretch ourselves and our abilities to deal with the less-than-perfect that is so much a part of life. Realizing that the in-between only lasts a little while and spring always eventually comes.

Hi! I’m Meredith, a perfectly imperfect farm wife and Mama to two who found myself on a farm and continues to find myself through this life I've come to love. I'd be so happy to connect with you and hear more of your story. You can find me on  Facebook , Instagram, and  Twitter

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