Content ID

327462

Successful Farming celebrates moms

Take a walk down memory lane and see how mothers and grandmothers were depicted on the cover of Successful Farming magazine in the early 20th century.

Magazine and clothing styles may change over the years, but a mother’s love is forever.

March 1908

This hard-working mom sweetly snuggles her toddler outside the barn on the family farm.

Mrach 1908

March 1914

This illustration of a young man dreading the chore of helping his grandmother in the garden looks like something from the cover of The Saturday Evening Post, and with good reason! Artist Charles A. MacLellan painted 44 covers for that publication.

March 1914

August 1917

Grandma is busy knitting, but not too busy to sew up her grandson’s ripped baseball.

August 1917

November 1917

Junior doesn’t look too happy about having to help Grandma with the wash. His gun and hunting dog are waiting for him. Grandma, on the other hand, looks pretty pleased to have help cranking the wringer handle!

November 1917

December 1918

This Successful Farming cover, entitled “Christmas at Home,” depicts life for many families during a time of war. A soldier rests for a moment and imagines his wife and baby safe at home, while baby reaches for a soldier ornament on the Christmas tree.

December 1918

September 1922

A frost must be expected, since Mom and son are busy plucking ripe tomatoes off the vine and covering plants with a sheet.

September 1922

August 1925

By today’s standards, this mother and daughter are a bit overdressed for working in the garden, but since they’re just harvesting a few vegetables, hopefully they won’t get too dirty.

August 1925

June 1926

This mom has it all together! Even though there’s livestock right outside the door, her kitchen floor is still clean enough for the baby to crawl on, and she’s happily making lunch while looking beautiful. What a happy scene!

June 1926

November 1927

What a comforting sight! Mom looks beautiful as she pulls the Thanksgiving turkey out of the oven, and Junior is the first to taste-test the bird.

November 1927

May 1929

It’s spring cleaning time on this farm! Here, Mom watches over her son, who’s heading out the door with a rolled up rug and rug beater. He’s doing his duty, but looking longingly at his fishing pole next to the door.

May 1929

December 1932

There’s nothing more exciting for a farm kid than a trip to town. Here, a little girl and her mother enjoy a little window-shopping together. She has her eye on a pretty doll! 

December 1932

December 1940

Mrs. Miller and daughter Joan are busy writing Christmas cards on this 1940 Successful Farming cover.

December 1940

April 1941

Mrs. Russell Smith and her daughter, Sylvia, are featured on this classic Successful Farming cover. Mrs. Smith is carrying a box of baby chicks into the barn, followed by Sylvia, carrying a feeder and bucket of feed. 

April 1941

December 1941

The Successful Farming cover was redesigned again in the early 1940s, and this is the first Christmas cover featuring a photograph instead of a painting or drawing. Here, a soldier identified as Private Jim Lucas of Kansas opens a box from home, complete with homemade goodies and a photo of Mother.

December 1941

October 1942

The cover blurb identifies the woman in this cover as Mrs. Clarence Reddeman of Washtenaw County, Michigan. This sweet everyday scene captures the mother choosing a dress for her daughter, as she buckles her shoes.

October 1942

August 1943

Laura Gross of Missouri looks admiringly at her mother as they put up meals for the coming winter. What a beautiful harvest of carrots and tomatoes!

August 1943

April 1944

Here, Isabelle Johnson and her son, Leonard, are touted as a poultry-improvement team. The Michigan duo are carefully inspecting a new shipment of chicks. Leonard is wearing his Future Farmers of America sweater. 

April 1944

December 1944

The look of Successful Farming continued to evolve in the ’40s, but the tagline, “The magazine of farm business and farm homes,” remained. By 1944, the price jumped to 10¢. Here, a farm mom reads The Night Before Christmas to her kids.

December 1944

Read more about
Loading...

Talk in Marketing