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Co-op Tractors

  • Slide 1

    CO-OP MFS

    Certainly one of the least-known and rarest Co-op tractor ever sold was the Model MFS which was built by Huber Manufacturing of Marion, Ohio. The MFS is basically a repainted Huber Modern Farmer Model L. Powering that tractor was a Waukesha Model VIK four-cylinder, I-head engine.

  • Slide 2

    CO-OP NO. 1

    In 1936 the Farmers Union Central Exchange marketed a trio of models built for them by Duplex Machinery Co., Battle Creek, Michigan. The No. 1 and big brothers No. 2 and No. 3 were quite advanced for their time, featuring electric starting, lights and adjustable rear tread as standard equipment as well as road speeds up to 23 mph.

  • Slide 3

    CO-OP NO. 2

    The Co-op No. 2 was a standard-trend design powered by a Chrysler Industrial six cylinder engine with a 31/8x43/8-inch bore-and-stroke engine. A selective sliding-gear transmission along with the differential and axles were provided by Clark Equipment Co.

  • Slide 4

    CO-OP NO. 3

    Built in 1938, the No. 3 employed a Chrysler Industrial six cylinder engine with a 31/8x43/8-inch bore-and-stroke engine and weighed in a 5,000 pounds. A selective sliding-gear transmission along with the differential and axles were provided by Clark Equipment Co.

  • Slide 5

    CO-OP B-2

    In 1939 the National Farm Machinery Cooperatives hired Custom Manufacturing to design and build a third generation of tractors for them. The Shelbyville, Indiana-based firm paraded out the Co-op B2 the following year.

  • Slide 6

    CO-OP C

    There is a lot of mystery surrounding the Co-op Model C, most of which were built in 1944. This tractor is basically a Custom Model C (Custom Manufacturing Corporation of Shelbyville, Indiana) built by the National Farm Machinery Cooperative.

  • Slide 7

    CO-OP E2

    The Co-op E2, first built in 1951, was a Cockshutt Model 20 in every aspect except for color scheme. This lithe tractor was equipped with a 140 cubic inch Continental Model F124, four cylinder engine and four-speed transmission.

  • Slide 8

    CO-OP E3

    The Co-op E3 was actually a Cockshutt Model 30. Powered by a Buda 4B-153, 4-cylinder I-head engine, the model E3 generated 21.7-drawbar and 28-belt hp. in Nebraska Tractor Tests. The 153-cu.-in. engine featured removable sleeves, Novi governor, Marvel-Schebler carburetor and Auto-Lite ignition, generator and starter.

  • Slide 9

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No less than five different companies built tractors under the Co-op name in more than 10 states over a 17-year period.

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