Foreign Horses Part 2

  • LANZ FAMILY

    LANZ FAMILY

    Simple, rugged, dependable, and economical. Built by those attributes, Heinrich Lanz’s tractors became a favorite not only of fellow Germans, but also farmers across Europe and as far away as Australia. Lanz started manufacturing tractors in 1911 building its first semi-diesel machine in 1921.

  • LANZ BULLDOG MODEL S

    LANZ BULLDOG MODEL S

    This 1953 model of the Lanz Bulldog PS was powered by a two-cycle diesel which had the ability to burn different types of low-grade fuel. The PS utilized a hot bulb ignition system to start its single cylinder engine which turned out a rated 55 horsepower.

  • LANZ ALLDOG

    LANZ ALLDOG

    Certainly one of the most successful, if not also unique, multipurpose tractors was the Alldog Implement Carrier. The innovative machine was built to work in the field as a tractor utilizing an array of tillage equipment. But when it came time to haul produce to town and even the family to church, the Alldog could be fitted with a wagon with fairly impressive capacity.

  • LANZ BULLDOG 1616

    LANZ BULLDOG 1616

    This Model 1616 Bulldog, built in 1960, operates in just two cycles. But its starter is unlike anything you will find in this country. When engaged the starter turns the engine backward until its piston just about reaches top dead center, which would be the peak of compression. 

  • MARSHALL

    MARSHALL

    At the end of World War II, the vaunted British manufacturer Marshall Sons & Company looked to the future and introduced a highly stylized tractor that also featured a diesel engine. In 1945, the Field Marshall Mark I (seen at the left in the picture), also known as the Series 1, was born.

  • MCDONALD SD

    MCDONALD SD

    Australia may be home to some unusual animals. But when it came to horsepower, Aussie farmers were no different than their North American brothers-in-plowshares. In fact, the pioneer of Down Under tractors – Alfred Henry McDonald – modeled a machine that would look as much at home working in an Iowa cornfield as a New South Wales wheat paddock. 

  • PORSCHE JUNIOR DIESEL

    PORSCHE JUNIOR DIESEL

    Yes, it carries the same name as that sleek automobile. The fact is that the Porsche tractors was designed by famed engineer Dr. Ferdinand Porsche who was also the design father of the Volkwagen car. Porsche-Diesel Motorenbau was one of several European manufacturers that tried to market their tractors in the U.S. after World War II.

  • PORSCHE SUPER DIESEL

    PORSCHE SUPER DIESEL

    The three-cylinder Porsche Super Diesel Model 3 PL 33 employed an air-cooled engine that was rated for 37 horsepower. Built from 1957 to 1964, the Super Diesel offered such innovations as a tilting hood, passenger seat, four different PTO shafts and a spring-loaded front axle.

  • SUNSHINE MODEL A

    SUNSHINE MODEL A

    The Sunshine Harvester Company was at one time Australia’s biggest industrial concerns and it was a multinational business. The Company made a full range of farm machinery over the years it was in business at the suburb of Sunshine that was established by McKay for his employees. The Company survived between 1904 and 1955. 

  • GMV MODEL 25

    GMV MODEL 25

    Copying popular products isn’t confined to Rolex watches. Knocking off popular tractor designs was rampant in the farm machinery industry. Case in point in this copy of a John Deere Model B built to capitalize on Deere’s popularity in Sweden.

  • VOLVO DM T425

    VOLVO DM T425

    Volvo tractors are every bit a match in power and features of any American-built tractor for their time on our shores. In facts their Model T424 offered a four-speed syncromesh transmission, hydraulics and three-point hitch. The T425 was powered by an engine built by the tractor’s manufacturer, A-B Bolinder-Munktell of Sweden.

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The tractor isn’t a uniquely American-made invention. Check out Part 2 of these foreign horses.

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