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Interesting tractors and trucks selling soon, and tying up some $60K loose ends…

You can always tell when it's getting close to planting, harvest, and the end of the year. That's when a massive amount of auction inventory hits Tractor Zoom. Along with that, you'll usually find some interesting tractors showing up, too!

Such has been the case the past couple of weeks actually. Our auctioneers have had some terrific pre-harvest sales, and there's more coming!

Let's hit some interesting tractors and trucks crossing the auction block, and then we'll get to those $60K loose ends.

Allie: The 1939 Allis Chalmers B Low Rider!

The 1939 Allis Chalmers B

Photo: This is Allie, the 1939 Allis Chalmers B low rider from Madison, South Dakota!

See the Tractor Zoom listing for Allie here - lots more photos!

I love rat-roddy stuff, and I always have. So, when Jared Sutton listed this one late last week, I kind of fell for it!

Collectors and hot rodders have been modifying antique tractors for years now. The process is relatively straightforward; basically, the front axle turns upside down and the rear drop boxes rotated 90º. After that, it's a process of relocating stuff (tie rods, for instance), flipping the final drives and swapping them left/right so the brakes still work, and a lot of cosmetic stuff.

This one is nicely done, too. It's been outfitted with elephant-ear fenders (which are from a WD, I believe) and the exhaust has been re-routed under the tractor. It's been sprayed red, too - I wouldn't swear to it, but it looks quite a bit like IH 2150 red. That would make sense, too. Jack Bader, the man who owned this tractor, was a red collector. This is the one and only Allis Chalmers on his estate sale.

What's it worth? Honestly, I don't know. These low-rider tractors don't tend to change hands very often, and because of that, there aren't a lot of comps. This one is a fairly standard build with not a lot of extra custom touches (there are a few of these out there that are pretty wild - custom exhaust manifolds, custom wheel and tire setups, crazy paint jobs, etc.). It's well-built, and pretty well-known, too. Bidding currently sits at $2100, but I'd imagine it'll go for at least double that.

I'd be lying if I said that I didn't REALLY want to get in on the bidding for this one, but my lovely wife made it pretty clear that a single-seat low-rider tractor was about the LAST thing we need...

That may rule this one out, but if I can find a two-seater...

1987 Ford LTL 9000: Packin' 4 ¼...

1987 Ford LTL 9000 A

Photo: This is a darn good-lookin' daycab!

See the Tractor Zoom listing for this Nebraska Ford LTL 9000 - lots of photos!

The LTL 9000 came out in the mid-70s when Ford decided they wanted to play in the long-haul game with Kenworth and Peterbilt. The trucks were well-built and pretty stout, but they didn't come with the same kind of options for powertrains and drivelines. As a result, they didn't sell nearly as well as the W900 or the Pete 359/379. They're still pretty darn nice trucks, though, and the styling is a little different than what you typically see running up and down the road everyday.

This one is an '87 model day cab that, for the time being, lives in Ashland, NE. The owner restored it in 2013. It's powered by one of the best analog powerplants you can get, too - the venerable CAT 3406B. Granted, it's not tuned up quite like a Michigan Special, but at 435 horse, it'll do just fine with a hopper bottom on the back! It'll do it with some style, too!

1987 Ford LTL 9000 B

Photo: Somebody took their time on this one and did it right. Lots more photos at the link up above!

IH 1468 MFWD

IH 1468 MFWD

Photo: For a lot of IH nuts, a 1468 FWA is one of the most desirable models ever!

See the Tractor Zoom listing for this South Dakota 1468 FWA!

OK, quit drooling. Actually, go ahead. I drooled over it for a few minutes too.

This is another one of the tractors on Jared Sutton's auction this coming Saturday up in Madison, South Dakota.

I wrote a fairly lengthy article about 1468s back in January talking about why Harvester built a V8-powered tractor (spoiler alert...it was all Marketing's fault). Honestly, they look cool and sound great, but they really aren't much for farm tractors. The DV550 that sits in these things is tremendously fragile, but it DOES make a cool noise.

This one is probably no different, except for one or two important details. First, the Coleman FWA axle is neat. It is hydraulically controlled front drive axle that you could add at the dealership when you ordered your tractor, or as an aftermarket deal. In the field, they did help with traction, but they also added a LOT to the tractor's turning radius. I sent this to my buddy Chris the other day. He shot me back a text saying, "Man, that thing probably sounds cool, but it'll take 40 acres to turn around!"

He's probably not wrong, to be honest!

The second thing that makes this tractor a little unique is the stack configuration. I believe that the manifolds on these tractors are interchangeable from side to side, so if you wanted the exhaust closer to the operator, you could do it. Most farmers didn't because it was extra work and they look good the way they were. But, if your tractor is like Jack's and has a canopy, you can make that thing a LOT quieter if you put the stacks in the back. The stacks poke just above the roofline, which is likely a lot quieter. Good for long days on a tractor ride, I'd imagine!

At any rate, while the 68s weren't real successful in the field, time HAS been very kind to them. They are prized by collectors, and the rare ones that still have functional FWA axles from Coleman or Elwood fetch REALLY big money. I watched one sell back in March at the Mecum Gone Farmin' Auction and it sold for $63,000! They sold another in June for just over $47,000, too. I think you'll need at least $40K to play in this game. These tractors continue to appreciate; I don't think we've seen the peak values for them yet!

A4T-1600: The Minneapolis Moline Maverick

A4T-1600

Photo: Internally, the A4T tractors were termed "Project Maverick". . . now is your chance to own one!

See the Tractor Zoom listing for this big Moline in South Dakota - lots of photos!

Here's a big fella you don't see very often! The A4T-1600 tractors were Minneapolis Moline's first foray into the 4WD market in the late 60s. As other manufacturers began building 4WDs, Moline saw their sales of FWA tractors start to slip. So, they assigned the project to an up and coming engineer in his 20s named Mike Verhulst. Mike took Project Maverick from start to finish, and even won an award from the state of Minnesota for his efforts!

You'll note that this tractor isn't painted in the familiar Prairie Gold paint scheme that most Molines wore. With White Motors owning Moline, Oliver, and Cockshutt, there was a lot of badge engineering that happened around that time so that they could appeal to multiple markets. There are multiple versions of this tractor, and they're all badged and painted just a little differently. Oliver had a green one (the 2655), Moline had yellow ones and red ones, and White had one called the Plainsman. All the same basic tractor but badged and painted just a little differently. Sort of confusing, right? My friend Sherry Schaefer does a good job ironing it all out in an article in this month's Heritage Iron! Well worth picking up a subscription, or just ordering that issue on its own!

This particular A4T-1600 is an LP gas tractor that was originally an open station tractor, one of just 115 built! To make this one a little more rare yet, it was one of only 76 ordered with 23.1x30 tires. I'm not sure what the serial number was, but it's safe to say that this one is fairly uncommon. I doubt you'll see another one sell this year.

What's it worth? Again, it's a crapshoot here. They don't change hands very frequently. I checked our Iron Comps database and only found one of these big 4WDs in it. It sold for $12,000 about two years ago. I think that one was more original, though. Still, with $5 corn, you might find a couple of bidders that'll drive this one into $10-13K territory. You never know! It'll be fun to watch!

Tying up a couple of loose ends. . . 

The Empire from last week. . . 

Last week, I wrote about Harold and his Empire 88 that he'd modified so that he and his wife Wilma could take her mobility scooter with them on tractor rides. It was a really neat piece; Harold was very thoughtful in the design process for the modifications, and they all came together really nicely.

The Empire 88

Well, the hammer just dropped on that auction about an hour or so ago, and I'm happy to say that this little Empire sold for $3,193! That's great money for an Empire - probably one of the highest sale prices ever seen for one of these little guys!

Did Harold end up coming out on top? If you asked him, he'd tell you that from the numbers perspective...no, he probably lost money on the tractor if you counted the value of his time in building and restoring it. But, from an overall perspective? I'll bet he's tickled to death with it. The modifications that he made to that tractor allowed he and his dear wife to do what they loved...together. What more could you ask for?

The F-250 Power Stroke from two weeks ago. . . 

Boy oh boy, did this one ever generate some attention...

The auction wrapped up yesterday at about 11 a.m., and the final hammer price? A whopping $60,300!

1997 Ford-250 XLT Sold

Photo: Yep, she really sold for $60,300.

When I posted something congratulating the seller, auctioneer, and the new buyer, I think I almost broke the internet. Man alive, people got bent outta shape about that price! They either thought that we were lying, or that the buyer had lost his mind, or some other ridiculous combination of things.

"SOMEBODY PAID SIXTY GRAND FOR THAT THING??? You've gotta be kidding!?!? That's a $20K truck at most. . . what kinda drugs was the buyer taking?"

Yep, somebody actually wrote that.

You should see the stuff I had to delete from the thread on our Facebook page. I'm not gonna lie...there are some people with some real bad attitudes in this world, and they all seemed to find that post yesterday afternoon.
Here's the thing that most people don't understand about stuff like this:

• New(ish) pickups can be collector's items. Clean, low-mileage examples of OBS Fords with the 7.3 Power Stroke are becoming collector's items. This one is 24 years old. Twenty-five years old allows it to be titled as a collector car, and you can put collector car insurance on it.


• Collector cars attract a different market of buyers. They buy stuff based on a different set of characteristics. For many of them, they're looking at a truck like this as an investment. They'll hold on to it for another ten years in a clean, climate controlled environment alongside six Mustangs, two Corvettes, and thirteen other old pickups that are just as nice. They won't use it like a farm truck. They'll take it out a few times a year just to keep it in good working order. The next time we'll probably see it is when they decide they're going to sell it at Barrett Jackson or Mecum...and when they do, some other collector is going to buy it for $100,000 and do the same thing with it!


• Lastly, and most importantly...nobody got ripped off. Lots of people claimed that this truck was a fake, or that sketchy stuff was going on behind the scenes with this auction. None of that is true. Phil Wieck, the auctioneer, did a terrific job of documenting and presenting this pickup. He provided tons of photos, videos, and all of the information needed for buyers to decide whether or not it was worth it. Nobody rolled any odometers, nobody slapped 500 pounds of Bondo on a clapped-out farm truck and painted it and tried to pass it off as minty-fresh. This was, and is, the real deal. It's a survivor pickup, and collectors want those!


• If it proves anything, it proves that presentation matters. If you want to get top dollar for whatever you're selling - whether it's on AuctionTime, Craigslist, or anywhere else...presentation is important. Three photos, two of which are blurry...that ain't gonna cut it. Drag it out of the barnyard, wash it and detail it, and take a ton of photos. Show the good, the bad, and the ugly. Be truthful in your descriptions, and show the documentation you have. Do yourself a favor and put the time and effort into presenting it nicely. I guarantee that it'll help you get more for whatever you're selling.

Some of you may take issue with me on this, and that's fine. You're welcome to your opinion. I get it; it's tough to see a pickup that's not quite "old" but definitely not "new" as anything more than a utilitarian piece of metal. A trusty pickup. Something to throw junk in the back of and do truck stuff with.

Believe me, I get that. I drove past a Ford dealer every day on my way to high school back in Michigan, and I drooled over trucks just like this one too. To me, that doesn't seem so long ago, but the numbers don't lie. I graduated in 1996, so I've been out of high school for 25 years now. Those trucks still seem "new" (ish) to me, too.

Would I have thrown down $61K to own that pickup? No. But that's the thing. I'm not a collector. I couldn't justify a truck like that in my garage. But somebody did. To them, it was worth that much. I chose to be happy for them because they got something that they really wanted! I don't think they're insane for paying that, either. They have a different perspective than I do, and that's cool with me. I would hope that it's cool with you, too...even if you think that it sold for too much money.

Somebody thought it was worth it. Be happy for them!

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