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Farmer-Built Posthole Auger Skid

A posthole auger is awkward to handle and especially cumbersome to transport. 

“Sometimes it flops down and is hard to hook up,” says Eric Hermesch of Corning, Kansas. 

The built-in forklift boots on the skid he constructed make it much easier to load an auger and its spare bits into a pickup or onto a trailer. 

“This really simplifies things when we go out to build fence, for example. Because the skid holds the posthole auger in an upright position, it’s easy to hook up,” he says.        

Hermesch says he prefers having all the components together in one compact place instead of piled in the corner of the shed. This includes the spare bit; its round shape makes it difficult to strap down on a flat surface. “This way, we have everything in one shot, and we’re good to go,” he says.   

MATERIALS: 3×6-inch square tubing, 2-inch angle iron, flat iron 

TOOLS: Welder, band saw, tape measure 

More About Eric hermesch

Ag career: Heinen Brothers Ag in Seneca, Kansas, offers aerial and agronomy services. Eric Hermesch is the farm manager for the company.     

Education: Hermesch studied machine tool technology at Washburn Technical College in Topeka, Kansas. 

Family: Wife Jamie works at an area vet clinic. The couple has a 3-year-old son, Fredric, and a 4-month-old daughter, Clare. 

Pets: “We have a yellow Lab, and Jamie has several cats and a couple horses,” notes Hermesch. 

Free time: He enjoys spending time with his family and riding his four-wheeler. 

Email: eric@heinenbrosag.com 

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