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Modified Grain Cart Makes Loading Seed Tender Easy

Now that he loads the seed tender with a grain cart auger, Dillon Roesch of McClave, Colorado, is breathing easier – both literally and figuratively. “This way is much safer,” he says.

“I used to drive the loader up an incline to the dock and pull the seed tender in below. Someone then had to climb the ladder to open the bags. By standing on the ground, we can move away from the cloud of dust much more quickly, too,” he says. 

Modification to the grain cart took just one day. Roesch removed three sides, leaving only the side the auger goes through. Then he reinforced that one side by moving the end of the cables to the floor of the wagon and mounting a welded triangle of steel tubing to surround the auger. 

“The reason we needed this setup is that our cover crop mix (triticale, tillage radishes, and turnips) comes in these 1-ton bags. Strip-tilling those areas let us plant earlier in a very wet year,” he says. 

Additional features:

  • Lower profile: A loader can easily lift a 1-ton tote above a grain cart that has three of its sidewalls removed; the seed tender’s profile is too high.
  • Stay on the ground to open seed tote: No need to climb the ladder of the seed tender to open up a seed tote. 

More about dillon roesch

Ag career: Roesch, 19, has worked at neighbor Steve Wertz’s farm for five years. His ultimate goal (after obtaining a degree in agronomy/ag business) is to own a crop-production services company.  

Family: Parents Kelly (an Extension agent) and Julie Roesch (a bank compliance officer) lease their McClave, Colorado, farm acres, yet they arrange to graze their herd on the alfalfa and milo fields. 

FFA officer: Roesch is the 2017-2018 Colorado FFA state sentinel.  

Pilot: “I got to take all of my FFA officers flying, so that was fun,” says the licensed private pilot.  

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