Michigan farmer tops 2020 NCGA yield contest with 476-bushel-per-acre yield

Don Stall, Charlotte, Michigan, produced this yield in the conventional irrigated division.

Don Stall, Charlotte, Michigan, obtained the top yield in 2020’s National Corn Growers Association’s National Corn Yield Contest. He produced an entry with a yield of 476.9052 bushels per acre in the conventional irrigated division. 
 
The National Corn Yield Contest is now in its 56th year and remains NCGA’s most popular program for members, say NCGA officials. 
 
“This contest brings farmers together to create, innovate, and explore ways to optimize the nation’s largest and arguably most important crop,” says Debbie Borg, chair of NCGA’s member and consumer engagement action team. “At both the state and national levels, contest winners find new ways to excel while using a variety of techniques. Ultimately, the invention and improvement by farmers and input providers enable U.S. farmers to continue to meet the future demand for critical food, feed, fuel, and fiber.”
 
The 27 national winners in nine production categories had verified yields averaging more than 345.9948 bushels per acre, compared with the projected national average of 175 bushels per acre nationwide. While there is no overall contest winner, yields from first-, second-, and third-place farmers’ overall production categories topped out at 274.2037 bushels per acre.
 
Winners are traditionally honored in March during Commodity Classic. With the convention moving to a virtual format in 2021, NCGA is working with sponsors to find an alternative means to recognize the accomplishments of yield contest winners, say NCGA officials. 

Here is a complete list of 2020 national and state winners. 

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