Content ID

44800

Asian soybean rust in Iowa too late to affect crop

The first detection of Asian soybean rust in Iowa was reported last Friday. The find was in Dallas County in the last week of September and was at a very low incidence.

"It is not a big surprise that it was detected since computer modeling by X.B. Yang predicted that there was a better than 50% chance of the disease reaching Iowa late this season, and spores were found last month in both the wind and rain traps in Iowa," Jim Fawcett, Iowa State University Extension Field Agronomist, wrote in his weekly crop update.

Since most soybeans had reached R6 (full seed) size by late August, the disease should have very little or no impact this year in Iowa.

This is the furthest north that the disease has been detected. "Research has shown that Asian soybean rust spores are killed rapidly by sunlight, so that should decrease the likelihood of the disease developing in Iowa until late each season if it reaches Iowa at all," Fawcett says.

Soybean rust cannot overwinter except in the very southern U.S., so the find has no consequences for next year. Other finds have been reported in Illinois, Kansas, and Missouri.

The first detection of Asian soybean rust in Iowa was reported last Friday. The find was in Dallas County in the last week of September and was at a very low incidence.

Read more about
Loading...

Talk in Marketing