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SF Blog: Celebrate National FFA Week!

We’re thrilled that FFA New Horizons magazine, the flagship publication of the National FFA Organization, is now published by Meredith Agrimedia, the parent brand of Successful Farming magazine and Agriculture.com. I’m proud to be the editor of the magazine, and I suspect many readers of Agriculture.com swell with pride when they reflect on their days in the blue jacket.

Maybe you’re involved as a student member today, or maybe you’re active in an alumni chapter. Or, perhaps your membership has lapsed. Regardless of your FFA membership status or affiliation, I think we can all agree that FFA is the premier organization for developing students’ potential for leadership, personal growth, and career success through agricultural education.

A joy of my job is that I get to help tell the amazing stories of the 650,000 FFA students, alumni, teachers, and chapters in all 50 states, Puerto Rico, and the U.S. Virgin Islands. Stories like that of Corey Flournoy, a former FFA member at the Chicago High School for Agricultural Sciences. Corey became the first African-American national FFA president in 1994 and went on to teach ag leadership and education at the University of Illinois. He also worked to introduce Chicago high school students to agriculture and possible career opportunities in the industry. It’s an unexpected story, really, and one that speaks to the diversity and opportunity FFA can provide. I hear these kinds of stories most every day.

This week, FFA chapters around the country celebrate National FFA Week. It’s a time set aside each year to share what FFA is and the impact it has on members. I encourage you to check out the National FFA Week website for updates on the fun and important activities happening this week.

If you’re not an FFA member, but you’re interested in agriculture and leadership, as well as making a difference in their communities, I encourage you to join a chapter – or start a new one!

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