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Cooking Sweet Corn

Corn on the cob is a staple food in my house during the summer. We slather it with butter and a bit of salt, and devour every kernel. I usually cook mine by boiling it. Fill a pan with enough water to cover the corn, and bring it to a boil. If it’s fresh corn, 3-to-5-minutes should do it. If it’s a few days old, it might take up to eight-minutes.

On hot summer days when you don’t feel like standing near a pot of steamy water, do your cooking outside of the house by tossing sweet corn on a medium-hot grill. Another benefit is that grilling adds a smoky flavor. Peel back the husks to the stem but don’t remove them. Do get rid of the silks, however. Brush the corn with olive oil or butter, cover the cob back up with the husks, and secure the ends with a piece of aluminum foil.  Roast the ears for about 15-minutes, turning them occasionally until the husks are charred and toasted.

Sometimes you need a lot of corn to serve an army of people. There is an easy way to cook big batches all at once in a cooler – yes, I said a cooler.  Make sure the container is clean, strip off the husks and silks, and toss in the corn. Pour enough hot, boiling water over the cobs to cover them, shut the cooler lid, and in about a half-hour your corn is perfectly cooked for a crowd. It’ll stay warm in the cooler for an hour or even more if the lid stays shut.

Remember that for the best flavor, cook corn the same day it comes out of the field. If you wait longer than a day or so, it loses its sweet flavor and becomes starchy. 

Cooking corn in a cooler

Three easy ways to cook sweetcorn